Permanent Supportive Housing Prioritization & Recordkeeping Carrie Poser

Permanent Supportive Housing Prioritization & Recordkeeping Carrie Poser

Permanent Supportive Housing Prioritization & Recordkeeping Carrie Poser COC Director January 19, 2017 OVERVIEW Rules and policy Key terms and definitions Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH) projects PSH Prioritization Recordkeeping Coordinated Entry Questions HUD RULES & POLICY On December 4, 2015, the final regulation on the definition of chronically homeless was published in the Federal Register and compliance required as of January 15, 2016. On July 25, 2016, HUD released Notice CPD-16-11. HUD sought to achieve two goals: Establish an updated order of priority for dedicated and prioritized PSH.

Establish a recommended order of priority for PSH that is not dedicated or prioritized. https://www.hudexchange.info/resource/5108/notice-cpd-16-11-p rioritizing-persons-experiencing-chronic-homelessness-and-other -vulnerable-homeless-persons-in-psh / WI BALANCE OF STATE RULES & POLICY On Feb. 24, 2015, the BOS Board of Directors approved the Order of Priority for PSH in accordance with HUD Notice: CPD-14-012, issued July 28, 2014. On Aug. 11, 2016, the BOS Board of Directors repealed the Order of Priority for PSH previously approved by the Board in accordance with HUD Notice: CPD-14012, issued July 28, 2014. On Aug. 11, 2016, the BOS Board of Directors approved the Order of Priority for PSH in its entirety in accordance with HUD Notice: CPD-16-11, issued July 25, 2016. The Order of Priority became effective immediately and serves as an addendum to the BOS written standards for PSH. The criteria and recordkeeping requirements are set forth in the HUD Notice and

can be found at: https:// www.hudexchange.info/resources/documents/notice-cpd-16-11-prioritizing-persons-experienci ng-chronic-homelessness-and-other-vulnerable-homeless-persons-in-psh.pdf KEY TERMS & DEFINITIONS HOUSING FIRST Housing First is an approach in which housing is offered without preconditions (such as sobriety, mental health treatment, or a minimum income threshold) or service participation requirements All COC funded permanent supportive housing projects must be using the housing first approach to promote the acceptance of applicants regardless of their sobriety or use of substances, completion of treatment, or participation in services. Housing First is an approach that makes every effort possible to provide a client an opportunity to transfer from one housing situation, program, or project if tenancy is in jeopardy. Whenever possible, eviction back into homelessness is avoided. USICH: Housing First Checklist Are you really a housing first project? https:// www.usich.gov/resources/uploads/asset_library/Housing_First_Checklist_FINAL.p df

Per HUD: Any process that takes away personal choice is not Housing First. CHRONIC HOMELESSNESS DEFINITION HUD released the Chronic Homeless Definition final rule on December 4, 2015. The rule became effective January 4, 2016. The final rule applies to HUDs Continuum of Care Program (24 CFR part 578) and the Consolidated Submissions for Community Planning and Development Programs (24 CFR 91). Rule compliance required as of January 15, 2016. Definition does not apply retroactively to program participants enrolled in COC projects prior to January 15, 2016. CHRONIC HOMELESSNESS: Contains 3 components: Disability Category 1 homeless (literally homeless) Length of Category 1 homeless episode(s) Each criteria requires documentation: Verification of disability Homeless verification Length of homelessness

An individual or family can meet the criteria CHRONIC HOMELESS DEFINITION The definition of chronically homeless, as stated in Definition of Chronically Homeless final rule is: (a) A homeless individual with a disability, as defined in section 401(9) of the McKinney- Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11360(9)), who: i. lives in a place not meant for human habitation, a safe haven, or in an emergency shelter; and ii. Has been homeless and living as described in paragraph (a)(i) continuously for at least 12 months or on at least four separate occasions in the last 3 years, as long as the combined occasions equal at least 12 months and each break in homelessness separating the occasions included at least 7 consecutive nights of not living as described in paragraph (a)(i). Stays in institutional care facilities for fewer than 90 days will not constitute as a break in homelessness, but rather such stays are included in the 12-month total, as long as the individual was living or residing in a place not meant for human habitation, a safe haven, or an emergency shelter immediately before entering an institutional care facility; (b) An individual who has been residing in an institutional care facility, including a jail, substance abuse or mental health treatment facility, hospital, or other similar facility, for fewer than 90 days and met all of the criteria in paragraph (a) of this definition, before entering the facility; (c) A family with an adult head of household (or if there is no adult in the family, a minor

head of household) who meets all of the criteria in paragraph (a) or (b) of this definition (as described in Section I.D.2.(a) of this Notice), including a family whose composition has fluctuated while the head of household has been homeless. DISABILITY According to 24 CFR 583.5, a disability is defined as: A condition that: Is expected to be long-continuing or of indefinite duration; substantially impedes the individual's ability to live independently; could be improved by the provision of more suitable housing conditions; and is a physical, mental, or emotional impairment, including an impairment caused by alcohol or drug abuse, post traumatic stress disorder, or brain injury. or A developmental disability, as defined in section 15002 of this title; or The disease of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or any condition arising from the etiologic agent for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, including infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY Developmental disability means, as defined in section 102 of the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000 (42 U.S.C. 15002): (1) A severe, chronic disability of an individual that

Is attributable to a mental or physical impairment or combination of mental and physical impairments; Is manifested before the individual attains age 22; Is likely to continue indefinitely; Results in substantial functional limitations in three or more of the following areas of major life activity: (A) Self-care; (B) Receptive and expressive language; (C) Learning; (D) Mobility; (E) Self-direction; (F) Capacity for independent living; (G) Economic self-sufficiency. Reflects the individual's need for a combination and sequence of special, interdisciplinary, or generic services, individualized supports, or other forms of assistance that are of lifelong or extended duration and are individually planned and coordinated. (2) An individual from birth to age 9, inclusive, who has a substantial developmental delay or specific congenital or acquired condition, may be considered to have a developmental disability without meeting three or more of the criteria described in paragraphs (1)(i) through (v) of the definition of developmental disability in this section if the individual, without services and supports, has a high probability of meeting these criteria later in life. CATEGORY 1 HOMELESS According to 24 CFR 583.5, homeless is defined as:

An individual or family who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, meaning: An individual or family with a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings, including a car, park, abandoned building, bus or train station, airport, or camping ground; An individual or family living in a supervised publicly or privately operated shelter designated to provide temporary living arrangements (including congregate shelters, transitional housing, and hotels and motels paid for by charitable organizations or by federal, State, or local government programs for low-income individuals); or An individual who is exiting an institution where he or she resided for 90 days or less and who resided in an emergency shelter or place not meant for human habitation immediately before entering that institution; INSTITUTION An individual who has been residing in an institutional care facility, including a jail, substance abuse or mental health treatment facility, hospital, or other similar facility, for fewer than 90 days AND Meets the criteria for Category 1 homeless before entering that

facility. LENGTH OF HOMELESSNESS There are two options for length of homeless: Continuous At least 12 months in a place not meant for human habitation or safe haven or emergency shelter Cumulative At least 4 separate occasions in the last 3 years The combined occasions must equal at least 12 months Each occasion must be separated by a break of at least 7 consecutive nights NOT living in a place not meant for human habitation or safe haven or emergency shelter. CONTINUOUS HOMELESSNESS The key to this determination is: 12 consecutive months 1 day equals 1 month No evidence of a break Break is defined as 7 consecutive days staying in a place meant for human habitation and/or not in an emergency shelter or safe haven (e.g. staying with a friend, in a hotel/motel paid for by

client, transitional housing). CUMULATIVE HOMELESSNESS The key to this determination is: At least 4 separate occasions/episodes in last 3 years 1 day equals 1 month Must be a break of 7 consecutive nights (or longer) between each occasion/episode Break is defined as 7 consecutive nights staying in a place meant for human habitation and/or not in an emergency shelter or safe haven (e.g. staying with a friend, in a hotel/motel paid for by client, transitional housing). SEVERE SERVICE NEEDS Defined as either: i. History of high utilization of crisis services, which include but are not limited to, emergency rooms, jails, and psychiatric facilities; and/or ii. Significant health or behavioral health challenges, substance use disorders, or functional impairments which require a significant level of support in order to maintain permanent housing. iii. For youth and victims of domestic violence, high risk of continued trauma or high risk of

harm or exposure to very dangerous living situations. Severe service needs should be identified and verified through the use of a standardized assessment tool and process and should be documented in a program participants case file. The Balance of State COC has selected the VI-SPDAT or F-VI-SPDAT as the common assessment tool for Coordinated Entry. **Version 2** The determination must not be based on a specific diagnosis or disability type, but only on the severity of needs of the individual. The determination cannot be made based on any factors that would result in a violation of any nondiscrimination and equal opportunity requirements, see 24 C.F.R. 5.105(a). PERMANENT SUPPORTIVE HOUSING PROGRAMS (PSH) PERMANENT SUPPORTIVE HOUSING (PSH) Permanent housing (PH) is defined as community-based housing without a designated length of stay in which formerly homeless individuals and families live as independently as possible. Under PH, a program participant must be the tenant on a lease (or sublease) for an initial term of at least one year that is renewable and is terminable

only for cause. Further, leases (or subleases) must be renewable for a minimum term of one month. The CoC Program funds two types of permanent housing: permanent supportive housing (PSH) for persons with disabilities and rapid re-housing. Permanent supportive housing is permanent housing with indefinite leasing or rental assistance paired with supportive services to assist homeless persons with a disability or families with an adult or child member with a disability achieve housing stability. Rapid re-housing (RRH) emphasizes housing search and relocation services and short- and medium-term rental assistance to move homeless persons and families (with or without a disability) as rapidly as possible into permanent housing. DEDICATED CHRONIC HOMELESS BEDS Dedicated PSH beds are those which are required through the projects grant agreement to only be used to house persons experiencing chronic homelessness unless there are no persons within the CoC that meet that criteria. If there are no persons within the CoCs geographic area that meet the definition of chronically homeless at a point in which a

dedicated PSH bed is vacant, the recipient may then follow the order of priority for non-dedicated PSH established in this Notice, if it has been adopted into the CoCs written standards. The bed will continue to be a dedicated bed, however, so when that bed becomes vacant again it must be used to house a chronically homeless person unless there are still no persons who meet that criterion within the CoCs geographic area at that time. These PSH beds are also reported as CH Beds on a CoCs Housing Inventory Count (HIC). PRIORITIZED (NOT DEDICATED) CHRONIC HOMELESS BEDS Prioritization means implementing an admissions preference for chronically homeless persons for CoC Program-funded PSH beds. During the CoC Program competition project applicants for CoC Program-funded PSH indicate the number of non-dedicated beds that will be prioritized for use by persons experiencing chronic homelessness during the operating year of that grant, when awarded. These projects are then required to prioritize chronically homeless persons in their non- dedicated CoC Program-funded PSH beds for the applicable operating year as the project application is incorporated into the grant agreement.

The number of non-dedicated beds designated as being prioritized for the chronically homeless may be increased at any time during the operating year and may occur without an amendment to the grant agreement. Projects located in CoCs where a sub-CoC approach to housing and service delivery has been implemented, which may also be reflected in a sub-CoC coordinated entry process, need only to prioritize assistance within their specified area. For example, if a Balance of State CoC has chosen to divide the CoC into six distinct regions for purposes of planning and housing and service delivery, each region would only be expected to prioritize assistance within its specified geographic area. Project Name Total # of Beds FY 2016 Dedicated to CH Beds % of Beds

FY 2016 Prioritized (non-ded) % of Beds ADVOCAP Winnebagoland PSH 7 7 100% 0 0% CACSCW (new) 9 9 100%

0 0% City of Appleton Wireworks PSH 10 10 100% 0 0% Couleecap Housing First PSH 15 15 100%

0 0% Couleecap New Hope PSH 32 16 50% 16 50% Housing Partnership ITAV PSH 21 13 62% 8

38% KHDS (new) 10 10 100% 0 0% NEWCAP PSH 36 36 100% 0 0% NEWCAP Brown Singles

(new) 45 45 100% 0 0% NEWCAP Brown Families (new) 8 8 100% 0 0% Richards Place PSH

4 2 50% 2 50% State of WI Shelter Plus Care 59 59 100% 0 0% TSA of St. Croix PSH 48

48 100% 0 0% Walworth County Housing Authority PSH 14 14 100% 0 0% West CAP PSH 21 21

100% 0 0% Western Dairyland PSH 28 28 100% 0 0% EVIDENCE OF COMPLIANCE WITH PSH WRITTEN STANDARDS COC-funded PSH projects must follow the WI Balance of State PSH written standards and order of priority, as adopted by the CoC. Each COC-funded PSH project must document that they have incorporated the COCs written standards and order of priority into their agency or organizations intake policies and procedures.

Agency letterhead Signed by Executive Director or Program Director & dated Specifically referencing the WI Balance of State COC written standards and the WI Balance of State COC order of priority Specifically incorporating the WI Balance of State COC written standards and the WI Balance of State COC order of priority into the agencys intake policies & procedures Updated when the BOS policies are updated The written standards & order of priority can be found at: http:// www.wiboscoc.org/boscoc-forms-standards-and-policies.h ORDER OF PRIORITY ORDER OF PRIORITY Primary Prioritization: Chronic homeless + longest history of homelessness + severe service need Chronic homeless + longest history of homelessness Chronic homeless + severe service need Chronic homeless Alternative Prioritization:

If, after due diligence and active outreach efforts, there are no identifiable chronic homeless person(s) in the local coordinated entry area, a COC-funded PSH project can move on to the alternative prioritization. ALTERNATIVE PRIORITIZATION NO CHRONIC First PriorityHomeless Individuals and Families with a Disability with Long Periods of Episodic Homelessness and Severe Service Needs An individual or family that is eligible for CoC Program-funded PSH who has experienced fewer than four occasions where they have been living or residing in a place not meant for human habitation, a safe haven, or in an emergency shelter but where the cumulative time homeless is at least 12 months and has been identified as having severe service needs. Second Priority Homeless Individuals and Families with a Disability with Severe Service Needs. An individual or family that is eligible for CoC Program-funded PSH who is residing in a place not meant for human habitation, a safe haven, or in an emergency shelter and has been identified as having severe service needs. The length of time in which households have been homeless should also be

considered when prioritizing households that meet this order of priority, but there is not a minimum length of time required. Third Priority Homeless Individuals and Families with a Disability Coming from Places Not Meant for Human Habitation, Safe Haven, or Emergency Shelter Without Severe Service Needs. An individual or family that is eligible for CoC Program-funded PSH who is residing in a place not meant for human habitation, a safe haven, or an emergency shelter where the individual or family has not been identified as having severe service needs. The length of time in which households have been homeless should be considered when prioritizing households that meet this order of priority, but there is not a minimum length of time required. Fourth Priority Homeless Individuals and Families with a Disability Coming from Transitional Housing. An individual or family that is eligible for CoC Program-funded PSH who is currently residing in a transitional housing project, where prior to residing in the transitional housing had lived in a place not meant for human habitation, in an emergency shelter, or safe haven. This priority also includes individuals and families residing in transitional housing who were fleeing or attempting to flee domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault,

or stalking and prior to residing in that transitional housing project even if they did not live in a place not meant for human habitation, an emergency shelter, or a safe haven prior to entry in the transitional housing. RULE OF THUMB Identify those with longest history of homelessness first (those greater than 12 months cumulative vs. those less than 12 months cumulative). Those with longer histories (over 12 months cumulative) outweigh the VI-SPDAT or VI-F-SPDAT score. Once those with more than 12 months are served, then move on to the VI-SPDAT or VI-F-SPDAT score. For those under 12 months cumulative, those with the higher VI- SPDAT or VI-F-SPDAT score outweigh longest history of homelessness. SUMMARY CHRONIC FIRST Priority Chronic Disabilit y Length of Homelessness

First yes yes Longest period of homelessness Second yes yes Longest period of homelessness Third yes yes Just meets the CH required length of time

Fourth yes yes Just meets the CH required length of time Severe Service Need Has identified as severe service need Has identified as severe service need SUMMARY NO CHRONIC, THEN: Priority Category Disabili ty First 1 yes Second

1 yes Third 1* yes Fourth 1 yes Length of Homelessness Severe Service Need Longest period of homelessness (12 month or more cumulative) Has identified as severe service need Coming from TH, where prior

lived on street, safe haven, or emergency shelter. Includes fleeing or attempting to flee domestic violence are eligible for PSH even if they did not live on the streets, emergency shelter, or safe havens prior to entry to TH. PRIORITIZATION CHEAT SHEET Chronic homeless + longest homelessness + severe service need Chronic homeless + longest homelessness Chronic homeless + severe service need Chronic homeless Homeless + disability + longest homeless (12 months or more, cumulative) Homeless + disability + severe service need Homeless + disability + place not meant for human habitation, emergency shelter/motel voucher, or safe haven program Homeless + disability + coming from transitional housing VI-SPDAT & VI-F-SPDAT SCORES VI-SPDAT 2.0 & TAY VI-F-SPDAT 2.0

No Housing Intervention (03) No Housing Intervention (03) Rapid Re-Housing (4-7) Transitional Housing or Permanent Supportive Housing (8+) Rapid Re-Housing (4-8) Transitional Housing or Permanent Supportive Housing (9+) EXAMPLES EXAMPLE #1 You have 1 open bed in your PSH program. You have 4 CH applicants: Jimmy: Has been bouncing between shelter and his car for the last 14 months. His VI- SPDAT score is 17. He receives SSI for mental health. Bob: Has been staying in a shelter for the last 30 days. Before this episode, he has

been homeless 3 other times in the last 2 years (totaling 11 months). His VISPDAT score is 15. He has a disability verification signed for AODA. Chris: Has been sleeping in shelters for 30 days and then outside for 30 days as a cycle for the last two years. His VI-SPDAT score is 14. He receives SSI for mental health. Matthew: Has been in staying at a drop in shelter for the last 18 months. His VI-SPDAT score is 14. He has a disability verification signed for AODA. NAME Disabilit y? Meet the CH def? Length VISPDAT Jimmy

MH (SSI) Continuou s 14 months 17 Bob AODA (Ver) Episodes 12 months 15 Chris MH (SSI) Continuou

s 24 months 14 Matthew AODA (Ver) Continuou s 18 months 14 Priority Example #1: Answers & explanation NAME Disabilit

y? Meet the CH def? Length VISPDAT Priority Jimmy MH (SSI) Continuou s 14 months 17 3 Bob

AODA (Ver) Episodes 12 months 15 4 Chris MH (SSI) Continuou s 24 months 14 1 Matthew

AODA Continuou 18 14 2 (Ver) s months Identify those with longest history of homelessness (>12 months vs. <12 months) All of them do. What if Chris, Matthew & Jimmy had same length (24 months), then you would look at VI-SPDAT score. Chris (VI-SPDAT 14) vs. Matthew (VI-SPDAT 14) vs. Jimmy (VI-SPDAT 17) EXAMPLE #2 You have 1 open bed in your PSH program. You have 4 applicants: Shelly: Has been bouncing between shelter and her car for the last 20 months. Her VI- SPDAT score is 16. She has a disability verification for mental health. Angie: Has been staying in a shelter for the last 30 days. Before this episode, she has been

homeless 3 other times in the last 2 years (for a total of 8 months). Her VI-SPDAT score is 20. She has a disability verification signed for AODA. Betty: Has been sleeping at a drop in shelter for the last 8 months. Six months before, she slept in a shelter for 1 week. Six months before that, she spent 3 nights in her car. Three months before that, she spent 30 days in a shelter. Her VI-SPDAT score is 17. She receives SSI for mental health. Mary: Has been staying in a shelter for 12 months. Before that, she was staying in her car for 1 week. Her VI-SPDAT score is 13. She receives SSI for AODA and mental health. NAME Disabilit y? Meet the CH def? Length VISPDAT

Shelly MH (Ver) Continuou s 20 months 16 Angie AODA (Ver) Episodes 8 months 20 Betty MH (SSI)

Episodes 11 months 17 Mary AODA & MH (SSI) Continuou s 13 months 13 Priority Example #2: Answer & explanation NAME Disabilit

y? Meet the CH def? Length VISPDAT Priority Shelly MH (Ver) Continuou s 20 months 16 1 Angie

AODA (Ver) Episodes 8 months 20 3 Betty MH (SSI) Episodes 11 months 17 4 Mary AODA &

MH (SSI) Continuou s 13 months 13 2 Identify those with longest history (over 12 months) first: Shelly (20 months) vs. Mary(13 months) Then, looking at those with history (less than 12 months) switch gears and look at VI-SPDAT score Angie (VI-SPDAT 20) vs. Betty (VI-SPDAT 17) EXAMPLE #3 You have 1 open bed in your PSH program and cannot find anyone who meets the Chronic Homeless definition. You have 4 applicants: David: Has been staying in a shelter for the last 6 months. He has a disability verification for mental health. His VI-SPDAT score is 12.

Jackie: Has been staying in staying in a shelter for the last 2 months. She has disability verification signed for AODA. Her VI-SPDAT score is 18. Billy: Has been in Transitional Housing for the last 12 months. Prior to that, he was sleeping in his car for 12 months. He receives SSI for mental health. His VI-SPDAT score is 11. Michelle: Has been staying in a shelter for 3 months. Prior to that, she was sleeping in her car for 9 months. She receives SSI for AODA and mental health. Her VI-SPDAT score is 18. NAME Disabilit y? Literally Homeles s? Length

VISPDAT David MH (ver) Yes shelter 6 months 12 Jackie AODA (ver) Yes shelter 2 months 18 Billy

MH (SSI) Yes TH prior car 12 months TH 12 months car 11 Michelle MH & AODA (SSI) Yes shelter 12 months 18 Priority Example #1 Answers & Explanation

NAME Disabilit y? Literally Homeles s? Length VISPDAT Priority David MH (ver) Yes shelter 6 months 12 3

Jackie AODA (ver) Yes shelter 2 months 18 2 Billy MH (SSI) Yes TH prior car 12 months TH 12 months car 11

4 Michelle MH & Yes 12 months 18 1 Identify CH first:AODA Michelle shelter (SSI) Identify longest time category 1 homeless that is 12 cumulative months or more: None Then, it goes to VI-SPDAT score: David (12) vs. Jackie (18) RECORD KEEPING CHRONIC HOMELESS - EVIDENCE Documentation of Chronic Homelessness requires verification of: Disabling Condition and Homeless Verification and Duration of Homelessness. DISABLING CONDITION - EVIDENCE

Evidence of diagnosis with one or more of the following conditions: substance use disorder, serious mental illness, developmental disability (as defined in Section 102 of the Developmental Disabilities Assistance Bill of Rights Act of 2000 (42 U.S.C. 15002), post-traumatic stress disorder, cognitive impairments resulting from brain injury, or chronic physical illness or disability. Evidence of this criterion must include one of the following: Written verification of the condition from a professional licensed by the state to diagnose and treat the condition; Written verification from the Social Security Administration; Copies of a disability check (e.g., Social Security Disability Insurance check or Veterans Disability Compensation); Intake staff (or referral staff) observation that is confirmed by written verification of the condition from a professional licensed by the state to diagnose and treat the condition that is confirmed no later than 45 days of the application for assistance and accompanied with one of the types of evidence above; or Other documentation approved by HUD. Balance of State approved Certification of Disability form -

HOMELESSNESS - EVIDENCE Evidence of an individual or head of households current living situation may be documented by: An HMIS record or record from a comparable database A written observation by an outreach worker of the condition where the individual was living A written referral by housing or service provider, or A certification by the household seeking assistance that demonstrates that the individual or head of household is currently homeless and living in a place not meant for human habitation, in an emergency shelter, or a safe haven. Note this should be the last resort with due diligence and documented efforts to gain 3rd party written or oral verification first. Balance of State approved Homeless Verification form http://www.wiboscoc.org/boscoc-standards-and-policies.html INSTITUTION - EVIDENCE If the client has been residing in an institutional care facility for fewer than 90 days and was in a place not meant for human habitation, a safe haven, or an emergency shelter immediately prior to entering the facility, the evidence required includes: Discharge paperwork or a written or oral referral from a social worker, case manager, or

other appropriate official of the institutional care facility stating the beginning & end dates of time. All oral statements must be recorded by the intake worker If 3rd party evidence is not obtainable, a written record of the intake workers due diligence in attempting to obtain the evidence AND a certification by the individual seeking assistance that states that s/he is exiting or has just exited an institutional care facility where s/he resided for fewer than 90 days. Must have evidence of category 1 homeless prior to entering facility CONTINUOUS DURATION - EVIDENCE There must be documentation that the homeless occasion was continuous, for a year period, without a break in living or residing in a place not meant for human habitation, a safe haven, or in an emergency shelter. A break is considered at least seven or more consecutive nights not residing in a place not meant for human habitation, in shelter, or in a safe haven. At least 9 months of the 1-year period must be documented by one of the following: HMIS data, a written referral, or a written observation by an outreach worker. Only in rare & most extreme cases, HUD will allow an intake worker to obtain a certification

from the individual or head of household seeking assistance verifying the entire length of homelessness. There must be evidence of the efforts made to obtain third-party evidence as well as documentation of the severity of the situation in which the individual or head of household has been living. Note: A single encounter with a homeless service provider on a single day within 1 month that is documented through third-party documentation is sufficient to consider an individual or family as homeless for the entire month unless there is any evidence that the household has had a break in homeless status during that month (e.g., evidence in HMIS of a stay in transitional housing). EPISODIC DURATION - EVIDENCE There must be documentation to verify that the head of household experienced at least 4, separate, occasions of homelessness in the past 3 years. At least 3 of the 4 episodes must be documented by either: HMIS data, a written referral, or a written observation. Any additional episode(s) may be documented by a self-certification with no other supporting documentation. Only in rare & most extreme cases, HUD will allow an intake worker to obtain a certification from the individual or head of household seeking assistance in

place of the third-party documentation. There must be evidence of the efforts made to obtain third-party evidence as well as documentation of the severity of the situation in which the individual or head of household has been living BREAK Each break in homelessness of at least 7 consecutive nights not living or residing in a place not meant for human habitation, a safe haven, or in an emergency shelter between separate occasions must be documented with evidence including: HMIS Written observation by an outreach worker of the conditions where the individual was living Written referral by another housing or service provider Certification by individual seeking assistance AND intake workers documentation of the living situation of the individual/family seeking assistance AND steps taken to obtain preferred evidence (3rd Party, written observation, and written referral). LIMITATION ON SELF-CERTIFICATION At least 75% of the chronically homeless individuals or families assisted by project during an operating year can have NO MORE than 3 months of homelessness documented through self-certification. Said another way, no more than 25% of the chronically homeless individuals or

families assisted by a project during an operating year can have more than 3 months of homelessness documented through self-certification. Any self-certification requires thorough documentation of attempts to obtain 3 rd party documentation AND why 3rd party documentation was not obtained. This limitation does not apply to documentation of breaks in homelessness between separate occasions. Breaks can be documented entirely on self-report by the individual seeking assistance. COORDINATED ENTRY PRIORITIZATION LISTS The HMIS prioritization list and the Non-WISP prioritization list sort and prioritize based on the approved BOS order of priority for all programs. Something not working? If you notice that the HMIS prioritization list is not prioritizing the way you believe it should be, please contact your HMIS system administrator for your area. If you notice that the Non-WISP prioritization list is not prioritizing the way you believe it should be, please contact the COC Director at [email protected]

PRIORITIZATION LIST & REFERRALS It is prohibited for any HUD-funded homelessness assistance programs to serve individuals and/or families experiencing homelessness or who are at imminent risk of homelessness, without the household first going through the Coordinated Assessment System and receiving a referral to the Prioritization List. MISSING OR INCORRECT INFORMATION What happens when there is missing or incorrect data on the prioritization list? Can you ignore what is on the list? No, you cannot ignore what is on the list. If referring agencies have not done their due diligence to make sure their data is correct and up-to-date, it is their responsibility to fix it. If you are having difficulties engaging with these partners, please contact your ETH lead, HMIS system administrator for your area, your COC lead, and the COC Director. Coordinated Entry relies on everyone doing their part. This process will breakdown without that commitment.

Housing providers rely on the shelters and other referring entities to provide accurate information. Shelters and other referring entities rely on housing providers to enroll their clients. NO CHRONIC? The COC-funded PSH project must document how it was determined that there were no chronically homeless households identified for assistance within their local coordinated entry area at the point in which a vacancy became available. This documentation must include evidence of the outreach efforts that had been undertaken to locate eligible chronically homeless households within the defined geographic area If chronically homeless households have been identified but have not yet accepted assistance, the documentation should specify the number of persons that are chronically homeless that meet this condition and the attempts that have been made to engage the individual or family. Note: the project can reference the prioritization list as evidence but must document outreach efforts nonetheless.

Questions? RESOURCES Chronic Homeless Final Rule https:// www.hudexchange.info/resources/documents/Defining-ChronicallyHomeless-Final-Rule.pdf Notice CPD 16-11 https ://www.hudexchange.info/resource/5108/notice-cpd-16-11-prioritizin g-persons-experiencing-chronic-homelessness-and-other-vulnerable -homeless-persons-in-psh/

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • Drawing Lewis Structures and VSEPR OUTCOME QUESTION(S): C12-2-07

    Drawing Lewis Structures and VSEPR OUTCOME QUESTION(S): C12-2-07

    VSEPR. to predict bond shape from the electron arrangement. Vocabulary & Concepts Line Bond *Valence electrons determine atom reactivity* Aluminum. Fluorine. Al +3. ... SeCl. 2, CH 2 ClF, CO 2, NH. 4 1+,PO. 4 3-Se
  • LibrarySkills, Inc. is proud to present THE GENRE

    LibrarySkills, Inc. is proud to present THE GENRE

    Brenda Conn Carel Press LibrarySkills, Inc. is proud to present… THE GENRE GAME THE GENRE GAME Have fun reading with The Genre Game! THE GENRE GAME Promote the 'Healthy Reading' habit Encourage a varied reading diet THE GENRE GAME Explore...
  • Tri-Service Power Expo - 2003

    Tri-Service Power Expo - 2003

    Marine Corps Fuel Cell Efforts Tri-Service Power Exposition July 16, 2003 ALTERNATIVE POWER SOURCES FOR COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT (APSCE) USMC Fuel Cell Efforts Requirement under APSCE Alternative to Batteries Past Experimentation On-Going / Future Efforts Cooperative Efforts Fuel Cell Experimentation Ball...
  • What happened here?

    What happened here?

    Newly formed viral particles migrate through the cell and begin to bud through the cell membrane The NA molecules on the surface of the new viruses allow them to exit from the host cell The newly formed viruses are released...
  • Diapositiva 1

    Diapositiva 1

    Such are the places where every man, woman and child seeks equal justice, equal opportunity, equal dignity without discrimination. Unless these rights have meaning there, they have little meaning anywhere. Without concerned citizen action to uphold them close to home,...
  • Question 1 What do each of the hazard

    Question 1 What do each of the hazard

    The same mass of chalk and the same acid is used in all 4 experiments. Which experiment would take the longest time to finish. Question 9 . Matthew added 0.1g manganese dioxide to hydrogen peroxide solution and oxygen was produced....
  • LES FROMAGES FRANCAIS - WordPress.com

    LES FROMAGES FRANCAIS - WordPress.com

    * Les fromages francais * Le Camembert de Normandie C'est un des emblèmes gastronomiques de la France. C'est un fromage à base de lait de vache cru (сурово) de couleur blanche et de forme ronde, pesant 250 grammes et nécessitant...
  • Session 17 Warm  up: Find the missing measures.

    Session 17 Warm up: Find the missing measures.

    Old Hippie Some Old Hippie Came A Hoppin' Through Our Apartment SOHCAHTOA Old Hippie Sin Opp Hyp Cos Adj Hyp Tan Opp Adj Finding sin, cos, and tan 6 8 10 SOHCAHTOA Find the sine, the cosine, and the tangent...