Building A Better School Together 1 Planning Creating

Building A Better School Together 1 Planning  Creating

Building A Better School Together 1 Planning Creating a New Path Here is Edward Bear, coming downstairs now, bump, bump, bump on the back of his head behind Christopher Robin. It is, as far as he knows, the only way of coming downstairs, but somewhere he feels there is another way, if only he could stop for a moment and think of it. Milne (1926) 2 What is Planning? The space between where you are and where you want to be Identifying your highest priorities, setting goals and

selecting actions that will get you closer to those goals An active process of determining where you are going to spend your time and what you are going to focus on Activity management A prioritized check list 3 Planning To Improve Present Condition Planning Process Desired Condition

Where We Are What We Will Do To Get There Where We Want To Be 4 Planning For Success Gather Critical Evidence Regularly Monitor Progress

Develop A Purpose Celebrate Success Develop And Implement A Plan 5 The Results Cycle The Root of the Planning for School and Student Success Process SEE GET Results Achievement Attendance Attitudes Behaviours

School Culture Values Vision Purpose DO School Structures Programs Policies Procedures Rules 6 The Planning for School and Student Success Process Monitor/Adjust/ Assess Progress

Phase 2 Measure Current State Study Begin With The Heart Phase 1 Phase 5 Implement High-Yield Strategies

Purpose Vision Values Phase 3 Reflect Phase 4 Collaborative Learning Teams Plan Bringing hearts, heads, and hands to school-based planning 7

Culture Defined Organizational culture is the result of shared beliefs, values, expectations, and assumptions that direct individual and group thinking and behaviour. The culture shifts when members of an organization change their views of their work world and behave in a new way. Effective Planning can lead to a shift in culture as a result of changes in staff behaviour. 8 Shared Beliefs and School Culture CHARLES DARWIN SCHOOL We believe all kids can learn...based upon their ability. THE PONTIUS PILATE SCHOOL We believe all kids can learn....if they take advantage of the opportunities we give them to learn.

Adapted from DuFour, DuFour, and Eaker (2008) 9 Shared Beliefs and School Culture THE HAPPY VALLEY SCHOOL We believe all kids can learn...something, and we will help all students experience academic growth in a warm and nurturing environment. HARBORS OF HOPE HIGH SCHOOL We believe all kids can learn...and we will work to help all students achieve high standards of learning. Adapted from DuFour, DuFour, and Eaker (2008) 10 The Value of Shared Values Shared values are the foundation for building productive and genuine working relationships.

They: Are the internal compasses that enable people to act independently and interdependently Provide groups with a common reference for making decisions and taking action Kouzes and Posner (2011) 11 Johnson & Johnson Aligning Actions With Values The values that guide our decision making are spelled out in Our Credo. Put simply, Our Credo challenges us to put the needs and well-being of the people we serve first. The Credo was written by Robert Wood Johnson in 1943.

12 Johnson & Johnson Aligning Actions With Values The ActionsOn September 29, 1982, a Tylenol scare began when the first of several individuals died in Chicago after ingesting extra-strength Tylenol that had been deliberately laced with cyanide. Within a week, the company pulled thirty-one million bottles of capsules back from retailers. 13 Johnson & Johnson Aligning Actions With Values The OutcomeJohnson & Johnson consistently ranks at the top of the Harris

Interactive National Corporate Reputation Survey. It ranks as the worlds most respected company by Barrons Magazine. 14 Vision A vision describes the future you are trying to create. What we want our organization to become. It provides direction for planning. The vision should be clear, inspiring and able to capture the hearts of members of the organization. 15 The Power Of A Vision Our vision is to be earth's most customer centric company; to build a place where

people can come to find and discover anything they might want to buy online. Amazon 16 Purpose Statements Effective purpose statements answer two questions: 1. What are we trying to achieve? 2. What do we do that matters most? 17 Behaving On Purpose Google: Google's purpose is to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful.

18 The Planning for School and Student Success Process Phase 2 Measure Current State Study Creating an Intention Phase 1 Phase 5 Implement Purpose

Vision Values Phase 3 Reflect Phase 4 Plan Bringing hearts, heads, and hands to school-based planning 19 Data Based Planning In medicine, diagnosis always precedes treatment. Symptoms are assessed and tests done to determine the current

condition of the patient (make a diagnosis). The diagnosis results in a treatment plan which is then implemented and monitored for effectiveness. In school improvement planning, the same process holds true. 20 How Critical is the Evidence? 40% of McDonalds profits come from Happy Meals. The average ear of corn has eight hundred kernels arranged in sixteen rows. The number of possible ways of playing the first four moves per side in a game of chess is 318,979,564,321. American Airlines saved $40,000.00 in 1987 by eliminating one olive from each salad served in first class.

21 Critical Evidence in the Planning Process Data for Study Monitor/Adjust Data related to values becomes critical evidence for planning STRUCTURES, SYSTEMS, PROCESSES GOALS VALUES What we care about What we measure What we want to achieve What we need to change Critical Evidence for Planning

Critical evidence is used to set meaningful goals and make necessary changes in structures and systems. The information it provides helps to assess whether progress is being made toward achieving the goals that have been set. 22 Disaggregated Results for Language Arts 2010-11 Students in Grade 3 Percentage reaching acceptable level = 79.5 Percentage reaching excellence level = 13.7 Disaggregated Data: Acceptable Excellence Failing to Meet Acceptable Total Girls

Boys 79.5 13.7 6.8 83.2 15.4 1.4 75.8 12.0 12.2 23 The Planning for School and Student Success Process Phase 2

Measure Current State Study Creating an Intention Phase 1 Phase 5 Implement Purpose Vision Values Phase 3 Reflect

Phase 4 Collaborative Learning Teams Plan Bringing hearts, heads, and hands to school-based planning 24 Collaborative Learning Team Activities Undertake collective inquiry Establish plans for action Use timely,

relevant information to monitor and adjust Create an agenda and keep minutes Work collaboratively 3 Big Ideas Focus on results Focus on learning

Adapted from DuFour, DuFour, & Eaker (2008) Commit to continuous improvement Outcomes of collaboration are made explicit 25 Collaborative Learning Teams reflect on the critical evidence to decide: 1.What it tells about their students achievement 2.Which critical evidence is most important 3.Which students will be targeted for impact

Reflection on critical evidence is the first step in goal setting which must be guided by the schools values. Teachers cannot focus on more than two or three goals at a time. 26 Heart Criteria for Effective Goals 1. Staff can commit to achieving them 2. Measurable 3. Written in simple, easily understood language Head & Hands 4. Focused on student achievement 5. Linked to year end assessment or other standards-based means of determining student outcomes usually within a subject area

6. Facilitate comparison of student achievement from year to year 27 S.M.A.R.T. Goals Specific and Strategic Measurable Attractive and Attainable Results Focused Time Bound 28 S.M.A.R.T.ER. Goals Strategic and Specific Measurable Attainable Results focused Time bound E.R. Extra Reach

29 SMARTER GOALS By June of this year 100% of the students in grade 3 will have made at least 3 levels of improvement as measured on our 5 level literacy scale. In addition at least 80% of the students will successfully achieve 5 levels of improvement. 30 The Planning for School and Student Success Process Phase 2 Measure Current State

Study Creating an Intention Phase 1 Phase 5 Implement High-Yield Strategies Purpose Vision Values Phase 3 Reflect

Phase 4 Collaborative Learning Teams Plan Bringing hearts, heads, and hands to school-based planning 31 Implementing High-Yield Strategies A high-yield strategy is a concept or principle, supported by research or case literature, that will, when successfully applied in a school setting, result in significant improvement in assessed student achievement.

Hulley & Dier (2005) 32 Assessment As A High Yield Strategy Desired Check Differentiate Assess Results Readiness Teaching Student Identified for Success Strategies Progress Diagnostic Assessment Formative Assessment

Modify Teaching Success Strategie s Summative Assessment 33 The Improvement Loop Establish Purpose and Goals Plan Adjust Monitor: Take Action or Modify Actions

Monitor: Take Action or Modify Actions Improvement Loop 34 Continuous Improvement Next Continuous Improvement Loop Information gathered is included in the next planning cycle Revisit/Clarify Purpose and Goals nt e

Monitor/Adjust em Year End v o r p Study/Reflect/ s Im u Evaluate uo Monitor n nti o C Establish Purpose Information and Goals

gathered is included in the next planning cycle Adjust Year End Study/Reflect/ Evaluate Monitor Plan Continuous Improvement Loop Take Action/ Modify Actions

Take Action/ Modify Actions Improvement Loop One 35

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