Chapter 9 Net Present Value and Other Investment

Chapter 9 Net Present Value and Other Investment

Chapter 9 Net Present Value and Other Investment Criteria 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.2 Key Concepts and Skills Be able to compute payback and discounted payback and understand their shortcomings Understand accounting rates of return and their shortcomings Be able to compute the internal rate of return and understand its strengths and weaknesses Be able to compute the net present value and understand why it is the best decision criterion McGraw-Hill/Irwin

2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.3 Chapter Outline Net Present Value The Payback Rule The Discounted Payback The Average Accounting Return The Internal Rate of Return The Profitability Index

The Practice of Capital Budgeting McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.4 Good Decision Criteria We need to ask ourselves the following questions when evaluating decision criteria Does the decision rule adjust for the time value of money? Does the decision rule adjust for risk? Does the decision rule provide information on whether we are creating value for the firm? McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights

9.5 Project Example Information You are looking at a new project and you have estimated the following cash flows: Year 0:CF = -165,000 Year 1:CF = 63,120; NI = 13,620 Year 2:CF = 70,800; NI = 3,300 Year 3:CF = 91,080; NI = 29,100 Average Book Value = 72,000 Your required return for assets of this risk is 12%.

McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.6 Net Present Value The difference between the market value of a project and its cost How much value is created from undertaking an investment? The first step is to estimate the expected future cash flows. The second step is to estimate the required return for projects of this risk level. The third step is to find the present value of the cash flows and subtract the initial investment. McGraw-Hill/Irwin

2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.7 NPV Decision Rule If the NPV is positive, accept the project A positive NPV means that the project is expected to add value to the firm and will therefore increase the wealth of the owners. Since our goal is to increase owner wealth, NPV is a direct measure of how well this project will meet our goal. McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.8

Computing NPV for the Project Using the formulas: NPV = 63,120/(1.12) + 70,800/(1.12)2 + 91,080/(1.12)3 165,000 = 12,627.42 Using the calculator: CF0 = -165,000; C01 = 63,120; F01 = 1; C02 = 70,800; F02 = 1; C03 = 91,080; F03 = 1; NPV; I = 12; CPT NPV = 12,627.42 Do we accept or reject the project? McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.9 Decision Criteria Test - NPV Does the NPV rule account for the time value

of money? Does the NPV rule account for the risk of the cash flows? Does the NPV rule provide an indication about the increase in value? Should we consider the NPV rule for our primary decision criteria? McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.10 Calculating NPVs with a Spreadsheet Spreadsheets are an excellent way to compute NPVs, especially when you have to compute the cash flows as well. Using the NPV function The first component is the required return entered

as a decimal The second component is the range of cash flows beginning with year 1 Subtract the initial investment after computing the NPV McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.11 Payback Period How long does it take to get the initial cost back in a nominal sense? Computation Estimate the cash flows Subtract the future cash flows from the initial cost until the initial investment has been recovered

Decision Rule Accept if the payback period is less than some preset limit McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.12 Computing Payback For The Project Assume we will accept the project if it pays back within two years. Year 1: 165,000 63,120 = 101,880 still to recover Year 2: 101,880 70,800 = 31,080 still to recover Year 3: 31,080 91,080 = -60,000 project pays back in year 3 Do we accept or reject the project?

McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.13 Decision Criteria Test - Payback Does the payback rule account for the time value of money? Does the payback rule account for the risk of the cash flows? Does the payback rule provide an indication about the increase in value? Should we consider the payback rule for our primary decision criteria? McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights

9.14 Advantages and Disadvantages of Payback Advantages Easy to understand Adjusts for uncertainty of later cash flows Biased towards liquidity McGraw-Hill/Irwin Disadvantages Ignores the time value of money Requires an arbitrary cutoff point Ignores cash flows beyond the cutoff date Biased against long-term projects, such as

research and development, and new projects 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.15 Discounted Payback Period Compute the present value of each cash flow and then determine how long it takes to payback on a discounted basis Compare to a specified required period Decision Rule - Accept the project if it pays back on a discounted basis within the specified time McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights

9.16 Computing Discounted Payback for the Project Assume we will accept the project if it pays back on a discounted basis in 2 years. Compute the PV for each cash flow and determine the payback period using discounted cash flows Year 1: 165,000 63,120/1.121 = 108,643 Year 2: 108,643 70,800/1.122 = 52,202 Year 3: 52,202 91,080/1.123 = -12,627 project pays back in year 3 Do we accept or reject the project? McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.17

Decision Criteria Test Discounted Payback Does the discounted payback rule account for the time value of money? Does the discounted payback rule account for the risk of the cash flows? Does the discounted payback rule provide an indication about the increase in value? Should we consider the discounted payback rule for our primary decision criteria? McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.18 Advantages and Disadvantages of Discounted Payback

Advantages Includes time value of money Easy to understand Does not accept negative estimated NPV investments Biased towards liquidity McGraw-Hill/Irwin Disadvantages May reject positive NPV investments Requires an arbitrary cutoff point Ignores cash flows beyond the cutoff point Biased against long-term projects, such as R&D

and new products 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.19 Average Accounting Return There are many different definitions for average accounting return The one used in the book is: Average net income / average book value Note that the average book value depends on how the asset is depreciated. Need to have a target cutoff rate Decision Rule: Accept the project if the AAR is greater than a preset rate. McGraw-Hill/Irwin

2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.20 Computing AAR For The Project Assume we require an average accounting return of 25% Average Net Income: (13,620 + 3,300 + 29,100) / 3 = 15,340 AAR = 15,340 / 72,000 = .213 = 21.3% Do we accept or reject the project? McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.21 Decision Criteria Test - AAR

Does the AAR rule account for the time value of money? Does the AAR rule account for the risk of the cash flows? Does the AAR rule provide an indication about the increase in value? Should we consider the AAR rule for our primary decision criteria? McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.22 Advantages and Disadvantages of AAR Advantages Easy to calculate Needed information will usually be available

McGraw-Hill/Irwin Disadvantages Not a true rate of return; time value of money is ignored Uses an arbitrary benchmark cutoff rate Based on accounting net income and book values, not cash flows and market values 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.23 Internal Rate of Return This is the most important alternative to NPV

It is often used in practice and is intuitively appealing It is based entirely on the estimated cash flows and is independent of interest rates found elsewhere McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.24 IRR Definition and Decision Rule Definition: IRR is the return that makes the NPV = 0 Decision Rule: Accept the project if the IRR is greater than the required return McGraw-Hill/Irwin

2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.25 Computing IRR For The Project If you do not have a financial calculator, then this becomes a trial and error process Calculator Enter the cash flows as you did with NPV Press IRR and then CPT IRR = 16.13% > 12% required return Do we accept or reject the project? McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.26

NPV Profile For The Project 70,000 60,000 50,000 IRR = 16.13% NPV 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 -10,000 0 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.1 0.12 0.14 0.16 0.18 0.2 0.22 -20,000 Discount Rate

McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.27 Decision Criteria Test - IRR Does the IRR rule account for the time value of money? Does the IRR rule account for the risk of the cash flows? Does the IRR rule provide an indication about the increase in value? Should we consider the IRR rule for our primary decision criteria? McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights

9.28 Advantages of IRR Knowing a return is intuitively appealing It is a simple way to communicate the value of a project to someone who doesnt know all the estimation details If the IRR is high enough, you may not need to estimate a required return, which is often a difficult task McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.29 Summary of Decisions For The Project Summary Net Present Value

Accept Payback Period Reject Discounted Payback Period Reject Average Accounting Return Reject Internal Rate of Return Accept McGraw-Hill/Irwin

2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.30 Calculating IRRs With A Spreadsheet You start with the cash flows the same as you did for the NPV You use the IRR function You first enter your range of cash flows, beginning with the initial cash flow You can enter a guess, but it is not necessary The default format is a whole percent you will normally want to increase the decimal places to at least two McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights

9.31 NPV Vs. IRR NPV and IRR will generally give us the same decision Exceptions Non-conventional cash flows cash flow signs change more than once Mutually exclusive projects Initial investments are substantially different Timing of cash flows is substantially different McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.32 IRR and Non-conventional Cash Flows When the cash flows change sign more than

once, there is more than one IRR When you solve for IRR you are solving for the root of an equation and when you cross the x-axis more than once, there will be more than one return that solves the equation If you have more than one IRR, which one do you use to make your decision? McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.33 Another Example Non-conventional Cash Flows Suppose an investment will cost $90,000 initially and will generate the following cash flows: Year 1: 132,000

Year 2: 100,000 Year 3: -150,000 The required return is 15%. Should we accept or reject the project? McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.34 NPV Profile IRR = 10.11% and 42.66% $4,000.00 $2,000.00 NPV

$0.00 ($2,000.00) 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35 0.4 0.45 0.5 0.55 ($4,000.00) ($6,000.00) ($8,000.00) ($10,000.00) Discount Rate McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.35 Summary of Decision Rules

The NPV is positive at a required return of 15%, so you should Accept If you use the financial calculator, you would get an IRR of 10.11% which would tell you to Reject You need to recognize that there are nonconventional cash flows and look at the NPV profile McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.36 IRR and Mutually Exclusive Projects Mutually exclusive projects If you choose one, you cant choose the other Example: You can choose to attend graduate school next year at either Harvard or Stanford, but not both

Intuitively you would use the following decision rules: NPV choose the project with the higher NPV IRR choose the project with the higher IRR McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.37 Example With Mutually Exclusive Projects Period Project A Project B 0 -500

-400 1 325 325 2 325 200 IRR 19.43% 22.17%

NPV 64.05 60.74 McGraw-Hill/Irwin The required return for both projects is 10%. Which project should you accept and why? 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.38

NPV Profiles $160.00 $140.00 IRR for A = 19.43% $120.00 IRR for B = 22.17% $100.00 Crossover Point = 11.8% NPV $80.00 A

B $60.00 $40.00 $20.00 $0.00 ($20.00) 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3

($40.00) Discount Rate McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.39 Conflicts Between NPV and IRR NPV directly measures the increase in value to the firm Whenever there is a conflict between NPV and another decision rule, you should always use NPV IRR is unreliable in the following situations Non-conventional cash flows Mutually exclusive projects McGraw-Hill/Irwin

2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.40 Profitability Index Measures the benefit per unit cost, based on the time value of money A profitability index of 1.1 implies that for every $1 of investment, we create an additional $0.10 in value This measure can be very useful in situations where we have limited capital McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.41 Advantages and Disadvantages of Profitability Index

Advantages Closely related to NPV, generally leading to identical decisions Easy to understand and communicate May be useful when available investment funds are limited McGraw-Hill/Irwin Disadvantages May lead to incorrect decisions in comparisons of mutually exclusive investments 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights

9.42 Capital Budgeting In Practice We should consider several investment criteria when making decisions NPV and IRR are the most commonly used primary investment criteria Payback is a commonly used secondary investment criteria McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.43 Summary Discounted Cash Flow Criteria

Net present value Difference between market value and cost Take the project if the NPV is positive Has no serious problems Preferred decision criterion Internal rate of return Discount rate that makes NPV = 0 Take the project if the IRR is greater than required return Same decision as NPV with conventional cash flows IRR is unreliable with non-conventional cash flows or mutually exclusive projects Profitability Index Benefit-cost ratio Take investment if PI > 1 Cannot be used to rank mutually exclusive projects May be use to rank projects in the presence of capital rationing

McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.44 Summary Payback Criteria Payback period Length of time until initial investment is recovered Take the project if it pays back in some specified period Doesnt account for time value of money and there is an arbitrary cutoff period Discounted payback period Length of time until initial investment is recovered on a discounted basis Take the project if it pays back in some specified period There is an arbitrary cutoff period McGraw-Hill/Irwin

2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.45 Summary Accounting Criterion Average Accounting Return Measure of accounting profit relative to book value Similar to return on assets measure Take the investment if the AAR exceeds some specified return level Serious problems and should not be used McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights 9.46

Quick Quiz Consider an investment that costs $100,000 and has a cash inflow of $25,000 every year for 5 years. The required return is 9% and required payback is 4 years. What is the payback period? What is the discounted payback period? What is the NPV? What is the IRR? Should we accept the project? What decision rule should be the primary decision method? When is the IRR rule unreliable?

McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights

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