Breaking Ranks in the Middle Leadership Module Goal

Breaking Ranks in the Middle Leadership Module Goal

Breaking Ranks in the Middle Leadership Module Goal To help ensure your success as a leader as you engage in systemic reform to improve student performance through the recommendations in Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Reform. M1:2

Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Refer to Participant Material Module 1 #1 M1:3 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Objectives Deepen your knowledge of the Breaking Ranks in the Middle core areas, the recommendations within them, and

the cornerstone strategies. Increase your leadership capacity to collaborate and support the implementation of Breaking Ranks in the Middle. Explore Breaking Ranks in the Middle tools and methods for collecting data to promote conversation and inform decision-making. Increase your knowledge of professional development resources and technical support services for implementing Breaking Ranks in the Middle initiatives. Build relationships for networking and support. M1:4 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor

m Please refer to Participant Materials Module 1 #2 the Training Agenda M1:5 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m What is Breaking Ranks II? It is a theory about what high schools should be.

It is a compilation of reform ideas from practitioners. It is a statement of principles and a template for action. It is a complex set of recommendations for changing American high schools. M1:6 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Breaking Ranks in the Middle (BRIM) follows the BRII approach

M1:7 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m BRIM is not just another report about how to improve schools. It is a working document and a guidebook one that is designed by practitioners for practitioners. It is a collection of strategies that have worked in various locations. M1:8

Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m 3 Step Progression of BRIM Realize the need (your own awareness) Help others see the need to change (use values and data to make the case) Promote improved student performance by providing opportunities for students to build relationships within the school and between themselves and what they learn (implement the strategies) M1:9

Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Breaking Ranks Structure and Organization 3 Core Areas Collaborative Leadership (page 55) Personalization (page 127) Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment (page 175) 30 recommendations based on proven practices (pages 23-24) 9 Cornerstone Strategies

(pages 8-21) M1:10 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Cornerstone Strategies Key concepts: 1. essential learnings, rigor, real world relevance, mastery, aligned curriculum, effective teaching 2. dynamic teacher teams, common planning time, frequent high quality interactions between teachers and students. M1:11 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor

m Cornerstone Strategies Key concepts: 3. structured planning time, curriculum aligned across grades/schools, students academic, developmental, social, and personal needs, focus on transition 4. advisory in which students plan and assess academic, personal & social development with an adult M1:12 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor

m Cornerstone Strategies Key concepts: 5. teachers assess individual learning needs of students, teachers tailor instructional strategies and multiple assessments accordingly 6. teachers implement schedules to teach in the ways students learn best facilitate teaming facilitate planning

M1:13 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Cornerstone Strategies Key concepts: 7. leadership systems for involvement in decision-making by students, teachers, family members, and the community, effective communication among these groups. 8. all social, economic, and racial/ethnic groups have open and equal access to challenging activities and learning. M1:14 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor

m Cornerstone Strategies Key concepts: 9. professional development program that: is school-wide is comprehensive Is ongoing aligns staff personal learning plans with the requisite capacity in content, instructional strategies, and student developmental factors. M1:15 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor

m Why Break Ranks Module 2 Refer to p. XVII XVIII in the BRIM book (last paragraph on page XVII) M1:16 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Why Break Ranks? Think Pair Share Discuss this question for 5 minutes in the context of your

own school Write 2 or 3 reasons Volunteers share M1:17 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m NCLB New era of accountability: Schools held to new standards Principals expected to be instructional leaders Teachers required to reach all students Progress evaluated by individual

subgroup scores M1:18 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Why Break Ranks? Who Makes it Through Middle Level Ready 100 for High School? Percentage 80 72

70 60 52 51 Latino African American 40 20

0 All White Source: Jay Greene and Greg Forster. Public Middle Level Graduation and College Readiness Rates in the United States. The Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, September 2003. M1:19 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Virginia Accreditation Data 92% of all schools are fully accredited

96% of elementary schools 97% of high schools 71% of middle schools M1:20 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Why Break Ranks? Students who do not attend regularly, receive poor behavior marks, and/or fail Math or English have no more than: 10% chance of graduating on time 20% chance of graduating one year late

Half of all African-American and Hispanic students will drop out. Johns Hopkins University Philadelphia Study M1:21 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Why Break Ranks? U.S. 15 Year-Olds Rank Among 32 Participating Countries U.S. RANK READING MATH SCIENCE

M1:22 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m 15th 19th 14th The Challenge We Face American students from high-income families enter college at rates 25 percentage points higher than those from low-income families.

M1:23 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m The Challenge We Face About 50% of Native American, African-American, and Latino ninth graders complete Middle Level within three years, compared to 79% of Asian Americans and 72% of white students M1:24 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

Quick Discussion What does equity of participation mean in your school? M1:25 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m School Myths Derived from Data? Well compare our performance to any of the surrounding schools. That could never happen at our school. We have some of the best test scores

around. Our promotion rate is 95%...Our drop out rate is acceptable. Our school is above average in every standardized measure. M1:26 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Debrief Share some examples that might not be indicators of increased student achievement The data you collect in your school must be a true measure of

student success and not a myth M1:27 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Pretty Good Participant Material Module 2 #2 M1:28 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Reflection 5 minutes See Participant Material Module 2 #3 Reflect on these statements

M1:29 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Module 3: Nature of Adolescent Learners Discuss and demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of an effective school for adolescent learners. M1:30 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Four Generations in the Workplace

TRADITIONALS BOOMERS XERS MILLENNIALS Bruce Butterfield, CAE, APR President, The Forbes Group. Copyright 2005, The Forbes Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved M1:31 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m WHO ARE THEY? TRADITIONALS

77M 1900-45 BOOMERS 78M 1946-64 XERS 46M 1965-81 MILLENNIALS 80M 1982-02 Bruce Butterfield, CAE, APR President, The Forbes Group. Copyright 2005, The Forbes Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved M1:32 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m WHAT DO THEY VALUE?

TRADITIONALS satisfaction BOOMERS recognition XERS freedom MILLENNIALS meaning Bruce Butterfield, CAE, APR President, The Forbes Group. Copyright 2005, The Forbes Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved M1:33 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor

m Did you Include? Curious, motivated when challenged Need to be accepted by peers Changing physically Vulnerable and self-conscious Moral Idealistic From: At the Turning Point: The Young Adolescent Learner. The Turning Points Transforming Middle Schools M1:34 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

WHO ARE THE MILLENNIALS AND What are they like? Bruce Butterfield, CAE, APR President, The Forbes Group. Copyright 2005, The Forbes Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved M1:35 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m WHAT ARE THEY LIKE? Bruce Butterfield, CAE, APR President, The Forbes Group. Copyright 2005, The Forbes Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Realistic Optimistic Progressive Loyal Inclusive Collaborative Scheduled M1:36 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m MILLENNIALS HAVE ALWAYS BEEN CONSULTED

Bruce Butterfield, CAE, APR President, The Forbes Group. Copyright 2005, The Forbes Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved M1:37 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m MILLENNIALS HAVE ALWAYS KNOWN DIVERSITY Bruce Butterfield, CAE, APR President, The Forbes Group. Copyright 2005, The Forbes Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved M1:38 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor

m MILLENNIALS (AND XERS) WANT CONSTANT FEEDBACK They want it to be timely and two way Bruce Butterfield, CAE, APR President, The Forbes Group. Copyright 2005, The Forbes Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved M1:39 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

MILLENNIALS ARE GREAT COLLABORATORS Bruce Butterfield, CAE, APR President, The Forbes Group. Copyright 2005, The Forbes Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved M1:40 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m MILLENNIALS SEE LEADERSHIP as participative

Bruce Butterfield, CAE, APR President, The Forbes Group. Copyright 2005, The Forbes Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved M1:41 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m MILLENNIALS WERE BORN WITH TECHNOLOGY www.millennial.co m Bruce Butterfield, CAE, APR President, The Forbes Group. Copyright 2005, The Forbes Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved

M1:42 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Think - Share Given what you know about the development of adolescents and the traits of millennials outlined, what inferences can you draw that will help shape our schools? M1:43 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Module 4: Building Leadership Capacity Through Professional Growth

Leadership and the ability to distribute leadership are critical to school improvement M1:44 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Building Capacity What are the traits and behaviors of an effective leader? List at least 3. Compare your traits with others from your team.

Agree on 5. Share M1:45 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m To change an organization, the people within the organization must change and must increase their capacity to lead. M1:46 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Knowledge of teaching and

learning Skills necessary to effectively lead a school Attitudes that you display and what messages do you send M1:47 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m What Does it Take? KNOWLEDGE SKILLS ATTITUDES

M1:48 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Review Our List Knowledge, Skills, or Attitudes? M1:49 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m What does leadership look like in practice? Balanced combination of knowledge, skills, and attitudes

Focus on skills and their relationship to knowledge and attitudes M1:50 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m School Leadership Study What a school principal does is second only to teaching in raising student achievement, especially in our nations lowest performing schools. NASSP Newsleader, October 2005 M1:51 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor

m Leadership Leadership is not something you do to people, but something you do with people. K. Blanchard, Leading at a Higher Level M1:52 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m 360 Feedback Instrument M1:53 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor

m Leadership Perspectives Providing opportunities for teachers professional development Metropolitan Life Survey of the Teacher 2003: An Examination of School Leadership. M1:54 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Demonstrated Weakest Skills EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

Setting Instructional Direction Teamwork Sensitivity RESOLVING COMPLEX PROBLEMS Judgment Results Orientation Organizational Ability COMMUNICATION SKILLS Oral Communication Written Communication DEVELOPING SELF AND OTHERS Development of Others Understanding Own Strengths and Weaknesses

M1:55 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Balanced Leadership Framework The data from our meta-analysis demonstrates that there is, in fact, a substantial relationship between leadership and student achievement. Balanced Leadership. McREL, 2003. M1:56 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

Balanced Leadership Framework (McREL 2004) Part 1 Affirmation Culture Change Agent Curriculum, instruction, assessment Communication

Contingent rewards Discipline M1:57 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Balanced Leadership Framework (McREL 2004) Part 2 Flexibility Focus Ideals/beliefs Input

Intellectual stimulation Knowledge of curriculum, instruction, assessment Monitors and evaluates M1:58 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Balanced Leadership

Framework (McREL 2004) Part 3 Optimizer Resources Order Situational awareness Outreach Relationships Visibility

M1:59 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Balanced Leadership Framework: Effective Leadership means more than simply knowing what to do its knowing when, how and why to do it. Effective leaders know how to balance pushing for change while at the same time, protecting aspects of culture, values, and norms worth preserving...They know how to gauge the magnitude of change they are calling for and how

to tailor their leadership strategies accordingly. McREL Meta-Analysis on Leadership (2004) M1:60 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Collaborative Leadership Collaborative cultures, which by definition have close relationships, are indeed powerful but unless focused on the right things may end up being powerfully wrong. Michael Fullan M1:61 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor

m Cornerstone Strategy 9 Align schoolwide professional development and Personal Learning Plans of staff with knowledge and skills in content instructional strategies student development factors M1:62 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Significant changes in

schools begin, I believe, with significant changes in what leaders think, say, and do. ~ Dennis Sparks M1:63 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m The Bottom Line What we do MATTERS! M1:64 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

Module 5: Collaborative Leadership and Professional Learning Communities M1:65 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m What are some of the lessons this exercise teaches about vision? What are some of the lessons about collaborative leadership? M1:66 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

Just because we are all heading in the same direction does not mean that we all see the vision in the same way. We may have different thoughts, feelings, and beliefs about the direction and the vision. M1:67 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Sowing the Seeds of Change The fact that the captain of the ship can clearly see the port is of no use if the crew continues to

paddle in a different direction. ~ Author Unknown M1:68 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Activity Explore Collaborative Leadership and Professional Learning Communities using an exploration tool Source of the tool is BRIM, pages 87-106 See PM Module 5 #1 Work independently to complete Part 1 of the Survey (do not use parts 2 and 3)

Instructions M1:69 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Teaming Coming together is a beginning, staying together is progress and working together is success. Henry Ford M1:70 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

School Leadership Team Building Questionnaire PM, Module 5 #3 Review the survey How can the survey be used when you return to your school? M1:71 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Module 6: Managing Complex Change

Review and discuss a variety of factors that contribute to effective change and develop greater understanding of how these factors contribute to the success or failure of an initiative for change. M1:72 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Sowing the Seeds of Change The fact that the captain of the ship can clearly see the port is of no use if the crew continues to paddle

in a different direction. Unknown M1:73 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m ~ Author Examine a Simple Change Pick up a pen or pencil with your non-preferred hand Follow my directions M1:74 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

Draw Nine Dots as Shown Solution Below. Connect the dots with 4 straight lines without raising your pen. M1:75 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Debrief What was your comfort level? What was the response time?

M1:76 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Debrief Comfort is important to all of us. Habits arise from the comfort that comes from knowing what to expect when we do the familiar. We dont like surprises. The unexpected, the unfamiliar, the uncomfortable makes us resist change. So, if we are uncomfortable with a small personal change like writing with the other hand, folding our arms differently, or thinking in an unusual way how much more uncomfortable will we be with major change that impacts the lives of teachers, students, parents, and the school community? For such change to have a chance of succeeding, we must plan

carefully and consider a variety of factors. Think for a moment about a change initiative that failed in your school. Why did it fail? M1:77 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Managing Complex Change Vision + Change Skills + Incentive + Resources

+ Action Plan M1:78 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m These elements of complex change only insure that change may occur successfully They do not insure that change will be sustained M1:79 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

Assessing Change Factors in Your School See PM Module 6 #1 Work with the form and discuss how the tool might be used to guide change planning in your school Identify an initiative that you could launch in your school to improve student achievement and use the tool M1:80 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Planning Pyramid

Locate PM, Module 6 #2 Major Tasks Moderately Difficult Undertakings Quick Wins M1:81 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Activity Using the Change initiative you identified using PM 6#1,complete the chart on PM 6 #2 M1:82 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor

m Data-Informed Change Activity Turn to BRIM, p. 58 (10 Assumptions About Change) Compare what Michael Fullan says with what you have said M1:83 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Change is difficult Must figure out your facultys

readiness to change BRIM has a tool to assist M1:84 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Locate PM, 6 #3 As a team, use the completed survey to: Identify areas where the difference between importance and practice are greatest How could you use this data to begin reform efforts How can this instrument be used in your school?

M1:85 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m For Incremental Change (McRELs First Order Change) Emphasize relationships Establish strong lines of communication Be an advocate for the school Provide resources Maintain visibility Protect teachers from distractions Create a culture of collaboration Look for and celebrate success

MCREL Meta- Analysis on Leadership (2004) M1:86 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m For Substantial Change (McRELs Second Order Change) Shake up the status-quo Hold everyones feet to the fire Propose new ideas

Operate from strong beliefs Tolerate ambiguity and dissent Talk research and theory Create explicit goals for change Define success in terms of goals MCREL Meta-Analysis on Leadership (2004) M1:87 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Responsibilities Negatively Affected by Second Order Change (the following may deteriorate) Culture: fosters shared beliefs and a sense of community and cooperation

Communication: establishes strong lines of communication with teachers and among stakeholders Order: establishes a set of standard operating principles and procedures Input: involves teachers in the design and implementation of important decisions and policies M1:88 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Technical vs. Adaptive Changes Technical problems are ones for which our current knowhow is sufficient.

Adaptive challenges are more complex and go beyond what we know M1:89 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Drivers of Adaptive Change Engaging peoples moral purpose Understanding the change process Building capacity Developing cultures for learning Developing cultures for evaluation Focusing on leadership for change Fostering coherence-making

Cultivating tri-level development Michael Fullan, 2005 M1:90 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Making Adaptive Changes Adaptive challenges demand a response beyond our current repertoire; Adaptive work that narrows the gap between our aspirations and current reality requires difficult learning; The people with the problem are the problem and the solution; Adaptive work generates disequilibrium and

avoidance; Adaptive work takes time. Heifetz & Linsky, 2004 M1:91 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m You have to change enough quickly enough so that gravity can not drag you back. ~ Theodore Sizer M1:92 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

Module 7: Personalization Examine the definition of personalization as it relates to middle level school practice Make the connection between personalization and academic rigor Increase understanding of the importance of personalizing the middle school student experience Focus on the personalization practices and recommendations related to effective advisory and transition programs M1:93 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

When you were 12 . See PM, Module 7 #1 When I was 10 . How would your students today respond to these questions? M1:94 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m See PM, Module 7 #2 Do you have any students who would relate to this poem? M1:95 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor

m How common is bullying? Nansel et al. (2001): national sample of 15,600 students in grades 6-10 19% bullied others sometimes or more often 9% bullied others weekly 17% were bullied sometimes or more often 8% were bullied weekly 6% reported bullying and being bullied sometimes or more often M1:96 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

Personalization Explores the Following: The experiences, relationships, support systems, and opportunities that todays students need to find in their school and community. The policies and practices that schools can employ to satisfy the developmental and academic needs of young adolescents? M1:97 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

Major Criticism of Schools They focus on student social development and personal adjustment, while neglecting academic rigor and high expectations for student behavior M1:98 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m FEATURE FILMS ARE THE RESULT OF YEARS OF SCIENTIFIC STUDY COMBINED WITH YEARS OF EXPERIENCE.

M1:99 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Ladder of Inference How We Make Assumptions Take Actions, based on beliefs Adopt Beliefs about the work Draw Conclusions Make Assumptions based on the meanings we add Add Meanings Select Data from what we

observe Observable data M1: 100 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m The process of moving up the ladder happens so quickly that we automatically or reflexively think reflexive thinking What I believe is true!

The truth is obvious. My beliefs are based on real data. The data I selected are the real data. M1: 101 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m We dont see things the same way. We see things through our own

lenses. Our perceptions become our truths. ME M1: 102 YOU Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m No problem until my reality and my truth doesnt match your reality and your truth Creates cognitive dissonance

We dont like cognitive dissonance so when this happens, we reinterpret the other persons reality! Youre dead wrong! or Youre an idiot. Either/Or thinking M1: 103 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m RELATIONSHIPS RECOGNITION ACCEPTANCE

TRUST RESPECT PURPOSE CONFIRMATION M1: 104 Breaking Ranks II: Strategies for Leading High School Reform Developmental Needs, Talents and Aspirations PERSONAL NEEDS

M1: 105 VOICE BELONGING CHOICE FREEDOM RELATIONSHIPS RECOGNITION

ACCEPTANCE TRUST RESPECT IMAGINATION PURPOSE SUCCESS CONFIRMATION Breaking Ranks II: Strategies for Leading High School Reform

M1: 106 VOICE BELONGING RELATIONSHIPS SCHOOL PRACTICES RECOGNITION

EQUITY ACCEPTANCE COMMUNITY TRUST OPPORTUNITY RESPECT RESPONSIBILITY

IMAGINATION PURPOSE CHALLENGE SUCCESS CONFIRMATION EXPECTATIONS CHOICE

FREEDOM Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Flexible Options for Engaged Learning Developmental Needs, Talents and Aspirations PERSONAL NEEDS Personalization A Learning Process in Which Schools Help Students:

Assess their own talents and aspirations, Plan a pathway toward their own purposes Work cooperatively with others on challenging tasks Maintain a record of their explorations & Demonstrate their learning against clear standards in a variety of media, All with the close support of adult mentors and guides. M1: 107 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor

m Personalization and Rigor Both should be evident in an effective middle school See PM, Module 7 #3 M1: 108 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m See PM, Module 7 #4

Review Discuss how this could be used in your school M1: 109 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m If rigor and personalization are both to be a part of the culture of the school, school leaders will have to be very intentional about identifying

and implementing the practices, policies, and procedures that are likely to assure that result. M1:110 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m What Went Wrong? Yes No ?? 16% 12% 17% 17%

72% 66% 20% 15% 11% 25% 65% 64% My teachers like to play and have fun. 8%

11% 81% There is an adult in my school I could talk to if I had a problem. 43% 12% 45% My teachers are happy. My teachers like to spend

time with me. Most teachers like kids. My teachers like to talk with kids informally. M1:111 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m H. Johnston, middleweb.com Advisory Every student should be well known by at least one adult. Students should be able to rely on that adult to help learn from their experiences,

comprehend physical changes and changing relations with family and peers, act on their behalf to marshal every school and community resource needed for the student to succeed, and help to fashion a promising vision of the future. Turning Points 2000 M1:112 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Recent Survey in the Northeast and Midwest 75% of teachers and 68% of parents thought that advisory programs were promising ways of helping

students develop strong self-concepts, to plan, and improve decision-making skills BUT only 32% of teachers and 40% of parents thought the programs in their schools were meeting the goals 90% of parents and teachers agreed that the concept of a personal adult advocate was important, only about 50% believed that existed in their school M1:113 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Satisfying Advisories There are common aims, obvious and memorable, that guide all

advisory tasks, such as: Support and caring from adults A constructive group of friends Relationships with the community through service projects M1:114 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Satisfying Advisories Leaders champion the program by: Promoting advisory in the community Providing ample professional development/resources Being actively engaged in the

program M1:115 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Satisfying Advisories Tangible Results Frequent celebrations of accomplishments Publicizing data on improved grades, attendance, achievement J. Burns, 1996 M1:116 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

Transition Programs Moving from elementary to middle or transferring between elementary schools is a major stepping stone on the road to becoming an adult Transition is complicated and is often associated with a decline in academic achievement, motivation, and self-perception When young adolescents are most likely to experiment with at-risk behavior M1:117 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

Helping Students Make the Transition Connect us up regularly with other students. Support us in developing skills & strategies for high school success. Help us make strong and mutually respectful connections with adults. Provide bridge experiences in the summer after 5th grade. K. Cushman, Educational Leadership, April 2006 M1:118 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

Four Basic Elements of Invitational Education Respect: Human beings are able, valuable, responsible and should be treated accordingly Trust: Living a fully functioning life is a cooperative, collaborative activity where process is an important as product (how you do something is just as important as the results) Optimism: People possess relatively untapped potential in all areas of human endeavor Intentionality: Human potential is best realized by creating and maintaining welcoming places, policies, programs, and processes and by people who are intentionally inviting with themselves and others, personally and professionally

M1:119 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Optimism Intentionality Respect M1: 120 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor

m Trust Lou Holtzs Three Questions Can I trust you? Do you care about me as a person? Are you committed to excellence? M1: 121 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor

m Personalization To teach each student well requires that we know each student well. Theodore Sizer M1: 122 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Module 8: Curriculum,

Instruction, and Assessment Explore Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment through an examination academic rigor and its relationship to each part of this core area Explore the connection between CIA and Personalization M1: 123 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

Turn to BRIM, p. 175 Note the title of the Chapter How do Personalization and Making Learning Personal differ? Read p. 175 M1: 124 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Making Learning Personal Designing Designinglessons

lessonsfor forunderstanding understanding begins with what we want students to be able to do and proceeds to the = Curriculum evidence we will accept that they have learned it. Only then does it turn to how = Assessment = ???? they will learn it. Along

the way, we = Instruction must be clear about what we want the students to understand and what we mean by understanding. Ron Brandt, Intro to UBD M1: 125 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Processing the CIA Recommendations Read the bulleted list of

recommendations on p. 176 As you read each of the recommendations, give each a priority rating of 1, 2, or 3 for your school (1 is highest) Compare your ratings with other members of your school team M1: 126 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Academic Rigor Activity

We are going to use a 1-2-4-8-group activity to define a term that should have a common and agreed up definition. WHAT IS ACADEMIC RIGOR? Activity can be used with faculty, parents, community to illustrate the need for conversation and agreement. M1: 127 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m In two minutes, write your personal definition of

academic rigor. Pair combine your definitions so you have one definition both of you can live with Pair with another pair (4s) combine the two definitions into one you can live with Pair with another foursome (8s) combine the two definitions into one you can live with write your definition on chart paper and post Each team presents its definition M1: 128 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

What does YOUR definition include? What we teach (C)? How we teach (I)? How we measure learning (A)? A combination? M1: 129 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m What does Academic Rigor

Look Like? Several good definitions but what would it look like in practice? What does CIA look like in practice? On the CIA sheet, take 10 minutes to brainstorm ideas on what C, I, and A would look like if it was academically rigorous Then we do another gallery walk M1: 130 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

Discussion 1.What teacher behaviors would indicate that rigor is present in elementary classrooms? 2. What student behaviors would indicate that rigor is present in elementary classrooms? 3. What student and teacher behaviors demonstrate that skillful teaching is occurring in elementary classrooms? 4. Finally, how can we measure academic rigor by questioning students? What questions do we need to ask? M1: 131

Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Making Learning Personal Academic press and social support predict student achievement, regardless of students backgrounds and their schools demographics. in order to succeed in schools that demand academic rigor, students need strong personal support as well. no matter how strongly a school caters to students affective and social needs, achievement depends on academic

expectations and demands. Academic Achievement in the Middle Grades: What Does the Research Tell Us? SREB, 2000 M1: 132 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m The Power of I M1: 133 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor

m Rigor At All Levels Students can do no better than the assignments they are given. Dr. Katie Haycock, Education Trust M1: 134 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Must have rigor and personal

support Locate PM, Module 8 #2 Scan the tool and discuss with your team how the tool could be used in your school M1: 135 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Student Responsibility for Learning Go to BRIM, p. 177

Read the indicators of Personalized Learning at the bottom M1: 136 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Helping Students Take Responsibility for Learning Personalized schools promote the achievement of standards for all students.

Personalized learning begins with individual interests so that each student becomes engaged in learning. Teachers get to know each students strengths, weakness, and interests. With the schools support, students become self-directed learners who can use learning to manage their lives. As students pursue an increasingly independent pathway, parents can assume new roles as guides and mentors in the learning experience. M1: 137 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor

m As students explore real options for their futures in the community, community members become involved in the schools in a meaningful way. Adults in the school model and benefit from stronger professional and student relationships. Students learn to set goals and measure success for themselves against common standards. Students advance to the next grade level upon demonstrating high performance in a variety of ways, not simply through norm-based tests. Reaching all students depends on reaching each one.

M1: 138 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Module 9: Cornerstone Strategies Tying It All Together In Your School M1: 139 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

Alice in Wonderland One day Alice came to a fork in the road and saw a Cheshire cat in a tree. Which road do I take? she asked. Where do you want to go? was his response. I dont know, Alice answered. Then, said the cat, it doesnt matter. M1: 140 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

If you dont now where youre going you might end up someplace else. Yogi Berra M1: 141 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Each school approaches change from a different perspective

Regardless of approach, research indicates some common strategies that have proven successful in implementing some or all of the 30 recommendations M1: 142 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Cornerstone Strategies (p. 8) Key concepts: 1. essential learnings, rigor, real world

relevance, mastery, aligned curriculum, effective teaching 2. dynamic teacher teams, common planning time, frequent high quality interactions between teachers and students. M1: 143 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Cornerstone Strategies Key concepts:

3. structured planning time, curriculum aligned across grades/schools, students academic, developmental, social, and personal needs, focus on transition 4. advisory in which students plan and assess academic, personal & social development with an adult M1: 144 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

Cornerstone Strategies Key concepts: 5. teachers assess individual learning needs of students, teachers tailor instructional strategies and multiple assessments accordingly 6. teachers implement schedules to teach in the ways students learn best facilitate teaming facilitate planning M1: 145

Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Cornerstone Strategies Key concepts: 7. leadership systems for involvement in decision-making by students, teachers, family members, and the community, effective communication among these groups. 8. all social, economic, and racial/ethnic groups have open and equal access to challenging activities and learning.

M1: 146 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Cornerstone Strategies Key concepts: 9. professional development program that: is school-wide is comprehensive Is ongoing aligns staff personal learning plans with the requisite capacity in content,

instructional strategies, and student developmental factors. M1: 147 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Nine Cornerstone Strategies Reading Activity M1: 148

Group # Strategy/Supporting Actions 1 Cornerstone 1 9 10 2 Cornerstone 2

10 11 3 Cornerstone 3 11 12 4 Cornerstone 4 12 13

5 Cornerstone 5 14 15 6 Cornerstone 6 15 16 7

Cornerstone 7 17 18 8 Cornerstone 8 18 19 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Read Pages

There is no definitive answer for school reform that fits all schools as to where to start Structure, culture, and instruction are often starting points for systemic change The three are highly connected However, before change can be institutionalized, the culture must change M1: 149 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

Culture and Professional Learning Communities Mission Why do we exist? What are we here to do together? Is the mission embedded? Can the faculty, staff, community articulate the vision? Richard DuFour and Robert Eaker, Professional Learning Communities at Work, Solution Tree: Bloomington, Indiana, 1998. M1: 150

Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Vision What is our direction? If we are true to our mission, what will we become? The lack of a compelling vision is a major obstacle to school reform. Vision has little impact unless shared, accepted, and connected to the personal vision of teachers. M1: 151

Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Values or Guiding Principles How the faculty and staff intend to make sure the vision is implemented. Identify the attitudes, behaviors, and commitments necessary to implement the vision. No more than 10 statements. All students will learn. All students will be connected to an adult they can see themselves becoming. All students will participate in extracurricular activities. M1:

152 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Stories Culture is partly determined by the stories you, your faculty, your students, your parents, and your community tell What stories do you tell? Change your stories to change your culture M1:

153 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Entry Points Using one or more of the Cornerstone Strategies as an entry point will enable you to focus on change in more than one of the core areas and to implement several BRIM recommendations M1: 154

Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Return to your original group Each group will now participate in a simulated activity See PM, Module 9 #1 M1: 155 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

Decrease drop-out rates Priority Initiative M1: 156 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Module 10: Next Steps Planning Guide Determining Possible Entry Points

See PM, Module 10 #1 Next Steps Planning Guide Determining Possible Entry Points Refer back to PM Module 9 #1 Tying It All Together M1: 157 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m You have to change enough quickly enough so that gravity

can not drag you back. ~ Theodore Sizer M1: 158 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Success breeds success! To generate and sustain change, there must be some early successes Look at PM, Module 9 #1 Tying It All Together evaluate the strategies and specifics you wrote and

classify them as Quick Wins, Moderately Difficult, or Major Tasks List your strategies on PM, Module 10 #1 Follow Directions (10 minutes) Remember to consider complex change factors discussed earlier M1: 159 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Managing Complex Change Accountability Capacity building

Action Plan e Fiscal and g Resources Human n Collaboration a h Capacity building Incentive C Moral Purpose

Get basics right Skills Build Capacity Moral purpose Vision Big picture influence M1: 160 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Debrief in teams of four. For the next 25 minutes, each of you will share your priority with your group using a feedback loop. You will present your priority data point and the strategies for

addressing it to your group. Explain what would work in your school and why each is listed as a quick win, moderate, or difficult task. Each person will have three minutes for the description. In the next minute, each of your colleagues will provide feedback on your work and offer additional strategies M1: 161 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Group Debrief

How did talking about your ideas with a colleague and getting feedback strengthen or alter your plans? What are your next steps? M1: 162 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Cornerstone Strategy 9: Staff Development

Go to PM, Module 10 #1, page 2 Staff Development underpins all other strategies Staff Development must focus on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed for success Read directions for activity M1: 163 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m NASSP Contact

Dick Flanary Director, Professional Development Services 1-800-253-7746, ext. 294 [email protected] M1: 164 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m VASSP Contact Roger Jones Director, VASSP Center for Educational

Leadership at Lynchburg College 1-434-544-8444 [email protected] Janice Koslowski, Principal 571 252 2150 [email protected] M1: 165 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Goal To help ensure your success as a middle

level leader as you engage in systemic reform to improve student performance through the recommendations in Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Reform. M1: 166 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Accessing web resources Go to ftp://ftp.principals.org/

User name: brim Password: !!brim5% (the password is case sensitive and the two exclamation marks are part of the password!) After typing name and password, click the Log On button, you will see folders. Open the folder from which you need materials to find documents you may download. To download a file, copy the file to your desktop or another location you designate on your computer. When NASSP modifies or updates material, it will be added to the ftp site. Please do not share the user name and/or password. M1: 167

Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Module Reflection 1.What insights have I gained from these modules? (content, feelings, connections, recollections, etc.) 2.How might I use this information with the Leadership team or the faculty? Consider the modules just completed. Reflect on the uses of the content, the resources and people needed. Write your thoughts that best capture these ideas and processes on the Reflection Form in the

Participant Materials. M1: 168 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m Final Activity Complete the Evaluation and Feedback Document located at the end of your participation materials. M1:

169 Breaking Ranks in the Middle: Strategies for Leading Middle Level Refor m

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