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ICE the Quote 4 mini-lessons to practice integrating quotes Accompanies the Handout: ICE THE QUOTE Choosing, Using, and Explaining Evidence By Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates [email protected] 617-686-2330 www.collinsed.com/billatwood.htm Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Mini Lesson 1: Choosing the best words to Cite Objective: After reading 2 poems and a prompt, students will work to identify which words and phrases to quote to help make their argument. Steps: 1. Students will be asked to read the two poems and then respond to a quick write: Compare each speakers attitude toward nature (7 lines or more, 3 minutes) 2. After sharing with a neighbor, and adding ideas below the line, the teacher will take the students through a quick One Penny Whiteboard Session in which students will mark up key phrases and explain how they could be used to build an argument. 3. Students will be asked to explain or interpret the quote both to a partner and to the teacher. When they speak about how the quote supports a particular attitude, students will be encouraged with follow up questions to make the interpretation longer than the quote. If possible, the teacher will help students use subordinating phrases like: by using the word sparkling or when the speaker says I am a giant... 4. Closure: Students will make notes an a compare/contrast matrix showing how they will build their argument by adding relevant supporting quotes. Teacher will collect and check for understanding. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 The following poems came from a recent state test in fifth grade. The essay prompt and instructions are below. Compare the speakers attitude in First Night to the speakers attitude in Beech Leaves. Be sure to use details from both poems to develop your essay.

This question is a text-based essay question. Write your essay in the space provided in your Practice Test Answer Document. Your essay should: Present and develop a central idea. Provide evidence/details from the passage(s). Include correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea

And kick the frothing waves aside. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Quick Write (brainstorm) Grades 5-10 Name Date Describe each speakers attitude toward nature in both poems. Try to give evidence for you claim. (7 lines 3 minutes) Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Compare each speakers attitude toward nature. First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies

dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Quick Write (brainstorm) Grades 5-10 Name Date Sample quick write (grammar and spelling not important): In the first poem the speakers attitude is one that loves nature she wants to be outside and see things and she really sees the fireflies as dancing around her. Also she is not afraid of nature it seems like she wants to experience it like wear it on like a coat. In the other poem the speaker is like having fun and wants to bash around in a noisy way. He is crashing through leaves and waves and making animals nervous. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Using the One Penny Whiteboard Steps: 1. Have students insert the following page into a transparency sleeve. 2. Give students white board markers and erasers. 3. Ask questions similar to the ones shown in the next slides and have them mark the sleeve to show their ideas and then turn to a neighbor to practice answering the follow up questions. 4. Calls on students to give feedback and encourage more elaboration. 5. Model answers are suggested but of course there are many possibilities. The suggested solutions practice subordinating

the quote and using the main clause for the interpretation. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Working with Poems in General Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Circle the titles of both poems. First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13

14 15 16 17 18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make

In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Circle the authors of both poems. First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside.

Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Circle the 1st stanza of the first poem, First Night First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat

all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Circle the 2nd stanza of the second poem, Beech Leaves First Night

by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again

at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Underline rhyming words in the 1st stanza of First Night First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3

4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves

1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Underline rhyming words in the 2nd stanza of First Night First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6

Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4

In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Circle the rhyming words in stanza one in the poem Beech Leaves. First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard.

Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way

And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Circle the rhyming words in stanza two in the poem Beech Leaves. First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7

8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Find an example of personification in the 2nd stanza of First Night First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11

Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Find an example of a simile in the 3rd stanza of First Night First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head,

keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Find an example of a metaphor in the 2nd stanza of Beech Leaves First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by!

This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Find an example of alliteration in the 2nd stanza of Beech Leaves First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside.

Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Circle the apostrophe in stanza one in First Night. Why is it there? Possession! Aunt owns yard. First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside.

Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Working on Evidence Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 In First Night, underline 3-5 key phrases that show she enjoys nature. Try to find a quote in each stanza. First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea

And kick the frothing waves aside. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 How does sleeping was hard with all sparkling beauty hanging overhead show an appreciation of nature? First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside. When the speaker says, Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty overhead

it means she cant sleep because she is so amazed by the diamond-like stars hanging over her. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 How does the line Night-lights Zuri, everywhere! show that the speaker is new to being outdoors? First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside. By comparing nightlights to clusters of fireflies the speaker shows she hasnt been

outside very much. The only thing she can think to compare lightning bugs to is an electric light. Also, ending the line with an exclamation point and everywhere! the speaker shows true excitement. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 How can you tell the speaker is not bothered by the fireflies? Underline evidence and explain. First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside.

You can tell the speaker is not bothered by the fireflies because she says they are dancing round my head. She doesnt use words like, flying, buzzing, or swarming instead she uses the word dancing. The word dancing suggests something joyful and fun to watch. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Underline phrases in the third stanza of First Night could be used to show that the speaker is an observer of nature someone who wants to be part of nature not interfere with it? First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside.

When the speaker says that At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on it shows her wanting to be a part of nature. She wants to wear the night like a coat. Later, its almost as if she melts into the night when she falls asleep. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 If you wanted to make a claim that the speaker of the first poem feels protected by nature, underline phrases would you choose as evidence. First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside.

By describing nature as sparkling beauty and providing night lights the speaker shows she feels protected. Lights make you feel safe at night. Also, when she speaks of the sky as a thick overcoat that she might slip on she uses an image that suggests comfort. A thick overcoat is something that protects one from cold and pain and in this poem the night wraps her up, keeping her warm and In Beech Leaves, the speaker has an attitude of dominating nature. Underline 3-5 pieces of evidence to support this claim. First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri, I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4 In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside.

When the speaker says he loves to kick and make his steps echo and thunder so other creatures quake and cower he is using images that show he want to dominate nature. He says he is a giant who kicks the frothing waves aside. Giants are known for terrorizing other creatures and this speaker is stomping through the outdoors as a powerful force. Using a Matrix to Compare 2 Items Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Fill out the matrix using evidence from our discussion of the two poems. Feeling toward nature How interact with nature Feeling nature inspires in them The Speakers Attitude Toward Nature Evidence from First Night Evidence from Beach Leaves Possible Answer key The Speakers Attitude Toward Nature First Night Complete love Feeling toward sparkling beauty fireflies dancing nature Beach Leaves

Complete Joy love to kick merry noise Similar: Both love being out in nature! Not watching TV! Conqueror Observer Different! 1st night: Watches stars and small creatures quake and passive observer How interact cower bugs want to slip kick frothing waves aside Beach Leaves: active with nature participant darkness on Awe! Amazement., Feels powerful in Neither feels scared but Feeling nature for different reasons. feels safe nature inspires in them First night feels nature is Cant sleep. Fireflies I am a giant beautiful not scary. everywhere! sky is Beach leaves feels he is an thick overcoat more powerful than nature. Mini Lesson 2: Closely Reading and Identifying Features in a Model Essay Objective: After reading a model text-based essay, students will be able to identify effective use of quotes, interpretive sentences, and subordinating clauses and phrases. (Principles 1, 3, 5, 6) Steps: 1. Students will be asked to read the model essay and then respond to a quick write: What is good about this essay? (5 lines or more, 3 minutes)

2. After sharing with a neighbor, and adding ideas below the line, the teacher will take the students through a quick One Penny Whiteboard Session (transparency sleeve) in which students will mark up key parts of the essay to see how the essayist builds an argument. 3. Students will be asked to identify how the author subordinates his quotes and uses the main clause to interpret the quote. 4. Closing task: Students will pull the essay from the sleeve and find examples of claims, subordination of quotes, interpretations, and requoting. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 1 2 There are some important similarities and differences in each speakers attitude in the poems, First Night by Nicki Grimes and Beech Leaves by James Reeves. 3 On the surface, the poems share an obvious similarity: both speakers love being in 4 nature. In the first line of First Night the speaker addresses her friend Zuri writing, I wish 5 you were here. She is amazed by nature and wants to share the experience of camping out 6 for the first time. While the speaker says in line five, sleeping is hard, it is not because the 7 ground is hard, but instead because of all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. The 8 speaker clearly loves seeing the stars which seem to be hung there for all to enjoy. When 9

she says the fireflies are dancing round her head, it shows that she is not scared or 10 annoyed 11 12 but pleased. The word dancing suggests something fun, full of life, and joyful. In Beech Leaves, the speaker also loves nature. By describing his beachwood 13 walk among the leaves as a place where, I love to kick my way and hear their crisp and 14 crashing sound the speaker shows how much he appreciates nature and its distinct crisp 15 and crashing sounds. Also, when walking down to the shiny, pebbly sea he describes, 16 This brave and merry noise I makeThe speaker uses the words brave and merry because he is on a daring and joyful adventure through nature. 18 However, while both speakers love nature, each has a completely different attitude about 19 how to be outdoors. In First Night the speaker interacts with nature in a quiet way. She is 20 more of a spectator who cant sleep because she watches sparkling beauty overhead. When 21 the fireflies are dancing round her head she doesnt try to catch them or chase them instead 22 she allows them to happily fly about her. In the last stanza, she sees the darkness as an overcoat 23 and wants to slip the darkness on. The phrase slipping the darkness on gives the reader the 24

impression that she wants to be a part of nature-- not change it or rule over it in any way. 25 In Beech Leaves the speakers way of being in nature is different. He is active and 26 interested in dominating the natural world. He kicks his way through the leaves, loving the 27 crashing sound. Also he wants to hear his steps echo and thunder and enjoys how the small 28 creatures quake and cower as he walks by. Echo and thunder, quake and cower are the 29 words of a conqueror ruling over nature. The poem ends with him kicking the frothing waves 30 aside. Even in the water, he is like an all powerful Poseidon in control of the angry waves. 31 In conclusion, its clear that each speaker loves being in nature. But, each speaker also 32 relates to nature in very different ways. The speaker in the first poem, First Night, has an 33 attitude of an observer, quietly watching while the speaker in the second poem, Beach Leaves 34

shows a crashing, interactive, dominating attitude toward nature. Quick Write (brainstorm) Grades 5-10 Name Date Sample student writing What is good about this essay? The essay is good because it has a clear introduction with a claim. Also it gives lots of text support for the points. There are places where the writer explains the quotes and tells more about them. There are good transitions like also, however, and in conclusion. The conclusion is clear and restates the main points of the essay. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 What is good about this essay? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Clear claim which restates the prompt Identifies the similar attitude of speakers loves nature Offers complete, accurate, specific examples Specific quotes from the text explained Well organized similarities and differences Thoughtful word choices Effective transitions Clear conclusion Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017

Underline the central claim of the essay. 1 2 3 There are some important similarities and differences in each speakers attitude in the poems, First Night by Nicki Grimes and Beech Leaves by James Reeves. On the surface, the poems share an obvious similarity: both speakers love being in 4 nature. In the first line of First Night the speaker addresses her friend Zuri by writing, I wish 5 you were here. She is amazed by nature and wants to share the experience of camping out for 6 the first time. While the speaker says in line five, sleeping is hard, it is not because the 7 ground is hard, but instead because of all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. The 8 speaker clearly loves seeing the stars which seem to be hung there for all to enjoy. When she 9 says the fireflies are dancing round her head, it shows that she is not scared or annoyed but 10 pleased. The word dancing suggests something fun, full of life, and joyful. 11 In Beech Leaves, the speaker also loves nature. By describing his beachwood walk

12 among the leaves as a place where, I love to kick my way and hear their crisp and crashing 13 sound the speaker shows how much he appreciates nature and its distinct crisp and 14 crashing sounds. Also, when walking down to the shiny, pebbly sea he describes, This 15 brave and merry noise I make The speaker uses the words brave and merry because he is 16 on a daring and joyful adventure through nature. Underline two effective word choices in the claim of paragraph 2. Explain. Surface: shows that more important comparisons lie deeper. Obvious: anyone can see them. 1 2 3 There are some important similarities and differences in each speakers attitude in the poems, First Night by Nicki Grimes and Beech Leaves by James Reeves. On the surface, the poems share an obvious similarity: both speakers love being in 4 nature. In the first line of First Night the speaker addresses her friend Zuri by writing, I wish 5 you were here. She is amazed by nature and wants to share the experience of camping out for 6 the first time. While the speaker says in line five, sleeping is hard, it is not because the

7 ground is hard, but instead because of all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. The 8 speaker clearly loves seeing the stars which seem to be hung there for all to enjoy. When she 9 says the fireflies are dancing round her head, it shows that she is not scared or annoyed but 10 pleased. The word dancing suggests something fun, full of life, and joyful. 11 In Beech Leaves, the speaker also loves nature. By describing his beachwood walk 12 among the leaves as a place where, I love to kick my way and hear their crisp and crashing 13 sound the speaker shows how much he appreciates nature and its distinct crisp and 14 crashing sounds. Also, when walking down to the shiny, pebbly sea he describes, This 15 brave and merry noise I make The speaker uses the words brave and merry because he is 16 on a daring and joyful adventure through nature.

Underline the part where the essay writer introduces (gives context) the first quote from the poem. 1 2 3 There are some important similarities and differences in each speakers attitude in the poems, First Night by Nicki Grimes and Beech Leaves by James Reeves. On the surface, the poems share an obvious similarity: both speakers love being in 4 nature. In the first line of First Night the speaker addresses her friend Zuri by writing, I wish 5 you were here. She is amazed by nature and wants to share the experience of camping out for 6 the first time. While the speaker says in line five, sleeping is hard, it is not because the 7 ground is hard, but instead because of all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. The 8 speaker clearly loves seeing the stars which seem to be hung there for all to enjoy. When she 9 says the fireflies are dancing round her head, it shows that she is not scared or annoyed but 10 pleased. The word dancing suggests something fun, full of life, and joyful. 11 In Beech Leaves, the speaker also loves nature. By describing his beachwood walk

12 among the leaves as a place where, I love to kick my way and hear their crisp and crashing 13 sound the speaker shows how much he appreciates nature and its distinct crisp and 14 crashing sounds. Also, when walking down to the shiny, pebbly sea he describes, This 15 brave and merry noise I make The speaker uses the words brave and merry because he is 16 on a daring and joyful adventure through nature. Use parenthesis to show where the essayist explains the first quote to show how it supports the argument 1 2 3 There are some important similarities and differences in each speakers attitude in the poems, First Night by Nicki Grimes and Beech Leaves by James Reeves. On the surface, the poems share an obvious similarity: both speakers love being in 4 nature. In the first line of First Night the speaker addresses her friend Zuri by writing, I wish 5 you were here. She is amazed by nature and wants to share the experience of camping out for 6

the first time. While the speaker says in line five, sleeping is hard, it is not because the 7 ground is hard, but instead because of all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. The 8 speaker clearly loves seeing the stars which seem to be hung there for all to enjoy. When she 9 says the fireflies are dancing round her head, it shows that she is not scared or annoyed but 10 pleased. The word dancing suggests something fun, full of life, and joyful. 11 In Beech Leaves, the speaker also loves nature. By describing his beachwood walk 12 among the leaves as a place where, I love to kick my way and hear their crisp and crashing 13 sound the speaker shows how much he appreciates nature and its distinct crisp and 14 crashing sounds. Also, when walking down to the shiny, pebbly sea he describes, This 15 brave and merry noise I make The speaker uses the words brave and merry because he is 16 on a daring and joyful adventure through nature.

In line six, the writer uses a subordinate clause (while) to introduce the quote. Use parenthesis to find this clause. 1 2 3 There are some important similarities and differences in each speakers attitude in the poems, First Night by Nicki Grimes and Beech Leaves by James Reeves. On the surface, the poems share an obvious similarity: both speakers love being in 4 nature. In the first line of First Night the speaker addresses her friend Zuri by writing, I wish 5 you were here. She is amazed by nature and wants to share the experience of camping out for 6 the first time. While the speaker says in line five, sleeping is hard, it is not because the 7 ground is hard, but instead because of all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. The 8 speaker clearly loves seeing the stars which seem to be hung there for all to enjoy. When she 9 says the fireflies are dancing round her head, it shows that she is not scared or annoyed but 10 pleased. The word dancing suggests something fun, full of life, and joyful. 11

In Beech Leaves, the speaker also loves nature. By describing his beachwood walk 12 among the leaves as a place where, I love to kick my way and hear their crisp and crashing 13 sound the speaker shows how much he appreciates nature and its distinct crisp and 14 crashing sounds. Also, when walking down to the shiny, pebbly sea he describes, This 15 brave and merry noise I make The speaker uses the words brave and merry because he is 16 on a daring and joyful adventure through nature. The author uses another subordinate clause (when) to introduce a quote in line 8. Use parenthesis to find it. Underline the main clause which interprets the quote. 1 2 3 There are some important similarities and differences in each speakers attitude in the poems, First Night by Nicki Grimes and Beech Leaves by James Reeves. On the surface, the share an obvious similarity: both speakers love being in nature. 4 In the first line of First Night the speaker addresses her friend Zuri by writing, I wish you 5 were here. She is amazed by nature and wants to share the experience of camping out for the 6

first time. While the speaker says in line five, sleeping is hard, it is not because the ground is 7 hard, but instead because of all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. The speaker clearly 8 loves seeing the stars which seem to be hung there for all to enjoy. When she says the 9 fireflies are dancing round her head, it shows that she is not scared or annoyed but pleased. 10 The word dancing suggests something fun, full of life, and joyful. 11 In Beech Leaves, the speaker also loves nature. By describing his beachwood walk 12 among the leaves as a place where, I love to kick my way and hear their crisp and crashing 13 sound the speaker shows how much he appreciates nature and its distinct crisp and 14 crashing sounds. Also, when walking down to the shiny, pebbly sea he describes, This 15 brave and merry noise I make The speaker uses the words brave and merry because he is 16

on a daring and joyful adventure through nature. The writer builds on the interpretation by requoting a phrase from the original quote and expands it. Underline this part in line 8-10. 1 2 3 There are some important similarities and differences in each speakers attitude in the poems, First Night by Nicki Grimes and Beech Leaves by James Reeves. On the surface, the poems share an obvious similarity: both speakers love being in 4 nature. In the first line of First Night the speaker addresses her friend Zuri by writing, I wish 5 you were here. She is amazed by nature and wants to share the experience of camping out for 6 the first time. While the speaker says in line five, sleeping is hard, it is not because the 7 ground is hard, but instead because of all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. The 8 speaker clearly loves seeing the stars which seem to be hung there for all to enjoy. When she 9 says the fireflies are dancing round her head, it shows that she is not scared or annoyed but 10 pleased. The word dancing suggests something fun, full of life, and joyful. 11

In Beech Leaves, the speaker also loves nature. By describing his beachwood walk 12 among the leaves as a place where, I love to kick my way and hear their crisp and crashing 13 sound the speaker shows how much he appreciates nature and its distinct crisp and 14 crashing sounds. Also, when walking down to the shiny, pebbly sea he describes, This 15 brave and merry noise I make The speaker uses the words brave and merry because he is 16 on a daring and joyful adventure through nature. Underline the claim in paragraph 3. 1 2 3 There are some important similarities and differences in each speakers attitude in the poems, First Night by Nicki Grimes and Beech Leaves by James Reeves. On the surface, the poems share an obvious similarity: both speakers love being in 4 nature. In the first line of First Night the speaker addresses her friend Zuri by writing, I wish 5 you were here. She is amazed by nature and wants to share the experience of camping out for 6

the first time. While the speaker says in line five, sleeping is hard, it is not because the 7 ground is hard, but instead because of all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. The 8 speaker clearly loves seeing the stars which seem to be hung there for all to enjoy. When she 9 says the fireflies are dancing round her head, it shows that she is not scared or annoyed but 10 pleased. The word dancing suggests something fun, full of life, and joyful. 11 In Beech Leaves, the speaker also loves nature. By describing his beachwood walk 12 among the leaves as a place where, I love to kick my way and hear their crisp and crashing 13 sound the speaker shows how much he appreciates nature and its distinct crisp and 14 crashing sounds. Also, when walking down to the shiny, pebbly sea he describes, This 15 brave and merry noise I make The speaker uses the words brave and merry because he is 16

on a daring and joyful adventure through nature. The author uses a phrase that starts with By to introduce another quote in line 11. Use parenthesis to find it. Underline the main clause which interprets the quote. 1 2 3 There are some important similarities and differences in each speakers attitude in the poems, First Night by Nicki Grimes and Beech Leaves by James Reeves. On the surface, the poems share an obvious similarity: both speakers love being in 4 nature. In the first line of First Night the speaker addresses her friend Zuri by writing, I wish 5 you were here. She is amazed by nature and wants to share the experience of camping out for 6 the first time. While the speaker says in line five, sleeping is hard, it is not because the 7 ground is hard, but instead because of all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. The 8 speaker clearly loves seeing the stars which seem to be hung there for all to enjoy. When she 9 says the fireflies are dancing round her head, it shows that she is not scared or annoyed but 10 pleased. The word dancing suggests something fun, full of life, and joyful. 11

In Beech Leaves, the speaker also loves nature. By describing his beachwood walk 12 among the leaves as a place where, I love to kick my way and hear their crisp and crashing 13 sound the speaker shows how much he appreciates nature and its distinct crisp and 14 crashing sounds. Also, when walking down to the shiny, pebbly sea he describes, This 15 brave and merry noise I make The speaker uses the words brave and merry because he is 16 on a daring and joyful adventure through nature. The writer builds on the interpretation by requoting a phrase from the original quote and expands it. Underline this part in line 15. 1 2 3 There are some important similarities and differences in each speakers attitude in the poems, First Night by Nicki Grimes and Beech Leaves by James Reeves. On the surface, the poems share an obvious similarity: both speakers love being in 4 nature. In the first line of First Night the speaker addresses her friend Zuri by writing, I wish 5 you were here. She is amazed by nature and wants to share the experience of camping out for

6 the first time. While the speaker says in line five, sleeping is hard, it is not because the 7 ground is hard, but instead because of all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. The 8 speaker clearly loves seeing the stars which seem to be hung there for all to enjoy. When she 9 says the fireflies are dancing round her head, it shows that she is not scared or annoyed but 10 pleased. The word dancing suggests something fun, full of life, and joyful. 11 In Beech Leaves, the speaker also loves nature. By describing his beachwood walk 12 among the leaves as a place where, I love to kick my way and hear their crisp and crashing 13 sound the speaker shows how much he appreciates nature and its distinct crisp and 14 crashing sounds. Also, when walking down to the shiny, pebbly sea he describes, This 15 brave and merry noise I make The speaker uses the words brave and merry because he is 16

on a daring and joyful adventure through nature. Go to the second page of the essay. Underline the claim that organizes the second half of this essay (line 18-19). Use parenthesis to show the concession (counter-claim) 18 However, while both speakers love nature, each has a completely different attitude about 19 how to be outdoors. In First Night the speaker interacts with nature in a quiet way. She is 20 more of a spectator who cant sleep because she watches sparkling beauty overhead. When 21 the fireflies are dancing round her head she doesnt try to catch them or chase them instead 22 she allows them to happily fly about her. In the last stanza, she sees the darkness as an overcoat 23 and wants to slip the darkness on. The phrase slipping the darkness on gives the reader the 24 impression that she wants to be a part of nature-- not change it or rule over it in any way. 25 In Beech Leaves the speakers way of being in nature is different. He is active and 26

interested in dominating the natural world. He kicks his way through the leaves, loving the 27 crashing sound. Also he wants to hear his steps echo and thunder and enjoys how the small 28 creatures quake and cower as he walks by. Echo and thunder, quake and cower are the 29 words of a conqueror ruling over nature. The poem ends with him kicking the frothing waves 30 aside. Even in the water, he is like an all powerful Poseidon in control of the angry waves. 31 In conclusion, its clear that each speaker loves being in nature. But, each speaker also 32 relates to nature in very different ways. The speaker in the first poem, First Night, has an 33 attitude of an observer, quietly watching while the speaker in the second poem, Beach Leaves 34 shows a crashing, interactive, dominating attitude toward nature. Find and underline the phrase that describes the speakers attitude toward nature in First Night. 18 However, while both speakers love nature, each has a completely different attitude about 19

how to be outdoors. In First Night the speaker interacts with nature in a quiet way. She is 20 more of a spectator who cant sleep because she watches sparkling beauty overhead. When 21 the fireflies are dancing round her head she doesnt try to catch them or chase them instead 22 she allows them to happily fly about her. In the last stanza, she sees the darkness as an overcoat 23 and wants to slip the darkness on. The phrase slipping the darkness on gives the reader the 24 impression that she wants to be a part of nature-- not change it or rule over it in any way. 25 In Beech Leaves the speakers way of being in nature is different. He is active and 26 interested in dominating the natural world. He kicks his way through the leaves, loving the 27 crashing sound. Also he wants to hear his steps echo and thunder and enjoys how the small 28 creatures quake and cower as he walks by. Echo and thunder, quake and cower are the 29 words of a conqueror ruling over nature. The poem ends with him kicking the frothing waves

30 aside. Even in the water, he is like an all powerful Poseidon in control of the angry waves. 31 In conclusion, its clear that each speaker loves being in nature. But, each speaker also 32 relates to nature in very different ways. The speaker in the first poem, First Night, has an 33 attitude of an observer, quietly watching while the speaker in the second poem, Beach Leaves 34 shows a crashing, interactive, dominating attitude toward nature. The author uses another subordinate clause (when) to introduce a quote in line 20-21. Use parenthesis to find it. Underline the main clause which interprets the quote. 18 However, while both speakers love nature, each has a completely different attitude about 19 how to be outdoors. In First Night the speaker interacts with nature in a quiet way. She is 20 more of a spectator who cant sleep because she watches sparkling beauty overhead. When 21 the fireflies are dancing round her head she doesnt try to catch them or chase them instead 22

she allows them to happily fly about her. In the last stanza, she sees the darkness as an overcoat 23 and wants to slip the darkness on. The phrase slipping the darkness on gives the reader the 24 impression that she wants to be a part of nature-- not change it or rule over it in any way. 25 In Beech Leaves the speakers way of being in nature is different. He is active and 26 interested in dominating the natural world. He kicks his way through the leaves, loving the 27 crashing sound. Also he wants to hear his steps echo and thunder and enjoys how the small 28 creatures quake and cower as he walks by. Echo and thunder, quake and cower are the 29 words of a conqueror ruling over nature. The poem ends with him kicking the frothing waves 30 aside. Even in the water, he is like an all powerful Poseidon in control of the angry waves. 31 In conclusion, its clear that each speaker loves being in nature. But, each speaker also 32 relates to nature in very different ways. The speaker in the first poem, First Night, has an

33 attitude of an observer, quietly watching while the speaker in the second poem, Beach Leaves 34 shows a crashing, interactive, dominating attitude toward nature. The writer builds on the interpretation by requoting a phrase from the original quote and expands it. Underline this part in line 23. 18 However, while both speakers love nature, each has a completely different attitude about 19 how to be outdoors. In First Night the speaker interacts with nature in a quiet way. She is 20 more of a spectator who cant sleep because she watches sparkling beauty overhead. When 21 the fireflies are dancing round her head she doesnt try to catch them or chase them instead 22 she allows them to happily fly about her. In the last stanza, she sees the darkness as an overcoat 23 and wants to slip the darkness on. The phrase slipping the darkness on gives the reader the 24 impression that she wants to be a part of nature-- not change it or rule over it in any way. 25

In Beech Leaves the speakers way of being in nature is different. He is active and 26 interested in dominating the natural world. He kicks his way through the leaves, loving the 27 crashing sound. Also he wants to hear his steps echo and thunder and enjoys how the small 28 creatures quake and cower as he walks by. Echo and thunder, quake and cower are the 29 words of a conqueror ruling over nature. The poem ends with him kicking the frothing waves 30 aside. Even in the water, he is like an all powerful Poseidon in control of the angry waves. 31 In conclusion, its clear that each speaker loves being in nature. But, each speaker also 32 relates to nature in very different ways. The speaker in the first poem, First Night, has an 33 attitude of an observer, quietly watching while the speaker in the second poem, Beach Leaves 34 shows a crashing, interactive, dominating attitude toward nature. Underline the claim that describes the attitude of the speaker in Beech Leaves. 18

However, while both speakers love nature, each has a completely different attitude about 19 how to be outdoors. In First Night the speaker interacts with nature in a quiet way. She is 20 more of a spectator who cant sleep because she watches sparkling beauty overhead. When 21 the fireflies are dancing round her head she doesnt try to catch them or chase them instead 22 she allows them to happily fly about her. In the last stanza, she sees the darkness as an overcoat 23 and wants to slip the darkness on. The phrase slipping the darkness on gives the reader the 24 impression that she wants to be a part of nature-- not change it or rule over it in any way. 25 In Beech Leaves the speakers way of being in nature is different. He is active and 26 interested in dominating the natural world. He kicks his way through the leaves, loving the 27 crashing sound. Also he wants to hear his steps echo and thunder and enjoys how the small 28 creatures quake and cower as he walks by. Echo and thunder, quake and cower are the

29 words of a conqueror ruling over nature. The poem ends with him kicking the frothing waves 30 aside. Even in the water, he is like an all powerful Poseidon in control of the angry waves. 31 In conclusion, its clear that each speaker loves being in nature. But, each speaker also 32 relates to nature in very different ways. The speaker in the first poem, First Night, has an 33 attitude of an observer, quietly watching while the speaker in the second poem, Beach Leaves 34 shows a crashing, interactive, dominating attitude toward nature. Underline the series of short quotes that the author uses to support the claim of active and dominating. 18 However, while both speakers love nature, each has a completely different attitude about 19 how to be outdoors. In First Night the speaker interacts with nature in a quiet way. She is 20 more of a spectator who cant sleep because she watches sparkling beauty overhead. When 21

the fireflies are dancing round her head she doesnt try to catch them or chase them instead 22 she allows them to happily fly about her. In the last stanza, she sees the darkness as an overcoat 23 and wants to slip the darkness on. The phrase slipping the darkness on gives the reader the 24 impression that she wants to be a part of nature-- not change it or rule over it in any way. 25 In Beech Leaves the speakers way of being in nature is different. He is active and 26 interested in dominating the natural world. He kicks his way through the leaves, loving the 27 crashing sound. Also he wants to hear his steps echo and thunder and enjoys how the small 28 creatures quake and cower as he walks by. Echo and thunder, quake and cower are the 29 words of a conqueror ruling over nature. The poem ends with him kicking the frothing waves 30 aside. Even in the water, he is like an all powerful Poseidon in control of the angry waves. 31 In conclusion, its clear that each speaker loves being in nature. But, each speaker also

32 relates to nature in very different ways. The speaker in the first poem, First Night, has an 33 attitude of an observer, quietly watching while the speaker in the second poem, Beach Leaves 34 shows a crashing, interactive, dominating attitude toward nature. Underline the interpretation in the re-quote in line 28-29. 18 However, while both speakers love nature, each has a completely different attitude about 19 how to be outdoors. In First Night the speaker interacts with nature in a quiet way. She is 20 more of a spectator who cant sleep because she watches sparkling beauty overhead. When 21 the fireflies are dancing round her head she doesnt try to catch them or chase them instead 22 she allows them to happily fly about her. In the last stanza, she sees the darkness as an overcoat 23 and wants to slip the darkness on. The phrase slipping the darkness on gives the reader the 24 impression that she wants to be a part of nature-- not change it or rule over it in any way.

25 In Beech Leaves the speakers way of being in nature is different. He is active and 26 interested in dominating the natural world. He kicks his way through the leaves, loving the 27 crashing sound. Also he wants to hear his steps echo and thunder and enjoys how the small 28 creatures quake and cower as he walks by. [Echo and thunder, quake and cower are the 29 words of a conqueror ruling over nature. The poem ends with him kicking the frothing waves 30 aside. Even in the water, he is like an all powerful Poseidon in control of the angry waves. 31 In conclusion, its clear that each speaker loves being in nature. But, each speaker also 32 relates to nature in very different ways. The speaker in the first poem, First Night, has an 33 attitude of an observer, quietly watching while the speaker in the second poem, Beach Leaves 34 shows a crashing, interactive, dominating attitude toward nature.

Use parenthesis to show the conclusion of this essay. Can you turn to your neighbor and add a sentence or two that might explain the significance of the different attitudes? Why is this comparison relevant or important? 18 However, while both speakers love nature, each has a completely different attitude about 19 how to be outdoors. In First Night the speaker interacts with nature in a quiet way. She is 20 more of a spectator who cant sleep because she watches sparkling beauty overhead. When 21 the fireflies are dancing round her head she doesnt try to catch them or chase them instead 22 she allows them to happily fly about her. In the last stanza, she sees the darkness as an overcoat 23 and wants to slip the darkness on. The phrase slipping the darkness on gives the reader the 24 impression that she wants to be a part of nature-- not change it or rule over it in any way. 25 In Beech Leaves the speakers way of being in nature is different. He is active and 26 interested in dominating the natural world. He kicks his way through the leaves, loving the 27 crashing sound. Also he wants to hear his steps echo and thunder and enjoys how the small

28 creatures quake and cower as he walks by. Echo and thunder, quake and cower are the 29 words of a conqueror ruling over nature. The poem ends with him kicking the frothing waves 30 aside. Even in the water, he is like an all powerful Poseidon in control of the angry waves. 31 In conclusion, its clear that each speaker loves being in nature. But, each speaker also 32 relates to nature in very different ways. The speaker in the first poem, First Night, has an 33 attitude of an observer, quietly watching while the speaker in the second poem, Beach Leaves 34 shows a crashing, interactive, dominating attitude toward nature. A possible conclusion showing relevance of comparison adding authors thoughts about topic. The difference in each speakers attitude reflects two completely different visions of how to interact with nature that is as old as the Bible. In the Bible, humans are seen two ways: as having dominion over nature and protectors of nature. As old as they are, these two viewpoints are common in our environmental policies today. Many people feel that the earth and its creatures are a resource to be grown, hunted, eaten, drilled, mined, and used for the complete benefit of humans. Others see humans as a just one part of the world whose role is to protect and conserve the beauty of the earth and all its creatures. These two poems, even though they are simplistic and playful, represents these two distinct views of nature. Understanding and

discussing them at an early age can lead to better insights and reconciliations that will help us find a way forward to both protect and use our earth responsibly. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Closing Task 17 points Pull the essay from the transparency slip. 1. Box the 5 main claims in the essay. Label them A B C D E (5 pts) 2. Use parenthesis to mark 4 examples of subordinating the quote (with words like while, when, by...) Number them 1-2-3-4 (4 pts) 3. For each subordination, underline the main interpretation clause for each quote. (4 pts) 4. Find 4 examples of re-quoting a word or phrase in a separate sentence and then elaborating on the meaning of the word. Bracket these examples and use the letter R for re-quote next to the line. (4 pts) Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Answer Key 1 2 There are some important similarities and differences in each speakers attitude in the poems, First Night by Nicki Grimes and Beech Leaves by James Reeves. A B 3 On the surface, the poems share one obvious similarity: both speakers love being in 4 nature. In the first line of First Night the speaker addresses her friend Zuri by writing, I wish 5 you were here. She is amazed by nature and wants to share the experience of camping out

6 for the first time. While the speaker says in line five, sleeping is hard, it is not because the 7 ground is hard, but instead because of all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. The 8 speaker clearly loves seeing the stars which seem to be hung there for all to enjoy. When 9 she says the fireflies are dancing round her head, it shows that she is not scared or annoyed 1 2 [ [ 10 but pleased. The word dancing suggests something fun, full of life, and joyful. 11 C R In Beech Leaves, the speaker also loves nature. By describing his beachwood walk 3 12 among the leaves as a place where, I love to kick my way and hear their crisp and crashing 13 sound the speaker shows how much he appreciates nature and its distinct crisp and 14 crashing sounds. Also, when walking down to the shiny, pebbly sea he describes, This [

15 brave and merry noise I make The speaker uses the words brave and merry because he is [ 16 on a daring and joyful adventure through nature. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Answer Key 18 However, while both speakers love nature, each has a completely different attitude about D 19 how to be outdoors. In First Night the speaker interacts with nature in a quiet way. She is 20 more of a spectator who cant sleep because she watches sparkling beauty overhead. When 21 the fireflies are dancing round her head she doesnt try to catch them or chase them instead 22 she allows them to happily fly about her. In the last stanza, she sees the darkness as an overcoat 23 and wants to slip the darkness on. The phrase slipping the darkness on gives the reader the 24 impression that she wants to be a part of nature-- not change it or rule over it in any way. 25

In Beech Leaves the speakers way of being in nature is different. He is active and 4 [ R E [ 26 interested in dominating the natural world. He kicks his way through the leaves, loving the 27 crashing sound. Also he wants to hear his steps echo and thunder and enjoys how the small 28 creatures quake and cower as he walks by. Echo and thunder, quake and cower are the 29 words of a conqueror ruling over nature. The poem ends with him kicking the frothing waves 30 aside. Even in the water, he is like an all powerful Poseidon in control of the angry waves. [ 31 [ R In conclusion, its clear that each speaker loves being in nature. But, each speaker also

32 relates to nature in very different ways. The speaker in the first poem, First Night, has an 33 attitude of an observer, quietly watching while the speaker in the second poem, Beach Leaves Mini Lesson 3: Subordinating the Quote Objective: After seeing an attempt to cite a quote and interpret the quote in two sentences, the student will be able to improve the writing by combining the quote and interpretation into one sentence by using subordinating devices: clauses (When) prepositional phrases (By) and verb phrases (i.e. Describing, Stating, Writing...) Steps: 1. Students will be shown a sample attempt at using and interpreting quotes in red. 2. Then after some modeling, students will be asked to turn to a neighbor and verbally practice coming up with a one sentence quote and interpretation. 3. After some practice students could practice independently writing down answers before responding. 4. Closing task: students will complete a worksheet similar to the practice exercises. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Turn to your neighbor and use a phrase that starts with By to improve the writing in red by putting the quote and interpetation into one sentence. The speaker says there was, sparkling beauty hanging overhead. These words show that she loves nature. By writing sparkling beauty hanging overhead the speaker shows she loves nature. By using the words, sparkling beauty hanging overhead to describe the stars, the speaker reveals her love of nature. She cant sleep with the amazing, diamond-like lights over her head. This is better because it shows the authors purpose, By using the words Also notice how the the writer uses a different phrase that renames the words in quotes to describe the stars and diamond-like lights so she can write more about it without being repetitive. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017

Use a verb phrase that starts with Describing to improve the writing in red by putting the quote and interpetation into one sentence. The speaker says, sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. This quote shows that she loves nature. Describing sleeping as, hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead the speaker shows how much she loves nature because she cant sleep with the dazzling stars above her. This is better because by taking the word sleeping out of the quote compresses the quote a little bit and develops the interpretation. Notice how the interpretation substitutes a synonym dazzling stars for sparkling beauty. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Use a subordinate clause that starts with When the speaker to improve the writing in red by putting the quote and interpetation into one sentence. The speaker says, sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. This quote shows that she loves nature. When the speaker says, sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead it shows that she loves nature because is so focused on its beauty she cant sleep. When the speaker says, sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead it suggests she both appreciates and loves nature so much it interferes with her sleep. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Use a phrase that starts with By describing to improve the writing by putting the quote and interpetation into one sentence. The speaker says, Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head. This shows that she is enjoying nature and the fireflies. By describing the fireflies as, Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere...dancing round my head the speaker shows she is excited and enjoying nature.

By describing the night insects as, Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere... clusters of fireflies dancing round my head its clear that she is captivated by nature. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Use a verb phrase that starts with Describing, writing or stating... to improve the writing in red by putting the quote and interpetation into one sentence. The speaker says, Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head. This shows that she is enjoying nature and the fireflies. Describing the fireflies as, Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere...dancing round my head she shows that she is completely in love with nature. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Use a subordinate clause that starts with When to improve the writing in red by putting the quote and interpetation into one sentence. The speaker says, Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head. This shows that she is enjoying nature and the fireflies. When the speaker says, Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere...dancing round my head she shows that she is excited and enjoying nature. When the speaker exclaims excitedly to her friend, Nightlights, Zuri, everywhere... clusters of fireflies dancing round my head its clear that she is entranced by nature and its night-time creatures. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 First Night by Nikki Grimes 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dear Zuri,

I wish that you were here. I camped out my first night in my aunts backyard. Sleeping was hard with all the sparkling beauty hanging overhead. 7 8 9 10 11 Night-lights, Zuri, everywhere! Clusters of fireflies dancing round my head, keeping me from bed for hours. 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 And the sky! Ive never seen one so blue-black, like a thick overcoat all buttoned up with stars. At midnight, I stretched my arms out to slip the darkness on, and opened my eyes again at dawn. Beech Leaves by James Reeves 1 2 3 4

In autumn down the beechwood path The leaves lie thick upon the ground. Its there I love to kick my way And hear their crisp and crashing sound. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 I am a giant, and my steps Echo and thunder to the sky. How the small creatures of the woods Must quake and cower as I pass by! This brave and merry noise I make In summer also when I stride Down to the shining, pebbly sea And kick the frothing waves aside. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Improve the writing by joining the quote and interpretation into one sentence. Use the suggested technique for each. 1. The speaker in Beach Leaves says, It is there I love to kick my way and hear the crisp and crashing sound. This shows he wants to dominate nature. (When) 2. The speaker writes, I am a giant, and my steps echo and thunder to the sky. This quote shows that the speaker feels in charge of nature. (By describing) 3. The speaker uses the words small creatures and quake and cower in the poem. These words show he wants to be a dominating force in nature. (Using choosing words like... Try to add a requote sentence elaborating on a word from quote. 4. In the last stanza, the speaker says he wants to kick the frothing waves aside. This means he has total power over nature even if nature is angry. (Although)

Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Possible Answers Improve the writing by joining the quote an interpretation into one sentence. Use the suggested technique for each. Help orient reader, tighten 1. The speaker in Beach Leaves says, It is there I love to kick my way and hear the crisp and crashing sound. This shows he wants to dominate nature. (When) When the speaker says of his trip down the leafy path, It is there I love to kick my way and hear the crisp and crashing sound, it shows how much he wants to dominate nature. 2. The speaker writes, I am a giant, and my steps echo and thunder to the sky. This quote shows that the speaker feels in charge of nature. (By describing) By describing himself as, a giant whose steps echo and thunder to the sky, the speaker asserts his authority over nature. Claims 3. The speaker uses the words small creatures and quake and cower in the poem. These words show he wants to be a dominating force in nature. (Using choosing words like... Try to add a requote sentence elaborating on a word from quote. Using words like small creatures and quake and cower, the speaker shows he wants to be a dominating force in nature. Both quake and cower suggest the fear someone feels in the presence of a powerful ruler. 4. In the last stanza, the speaker says he wants to kick the frothing waves aside. This means he has total power over nature even if nature is angry. (Although) Although the waves are frothing, the speaker wants to kick them aside showing an attitude of total power over nature. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Underline the source of this article. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Circle the authors name. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Use parenthesis to find the title of the article. Why is it in quotation marks? Article title are (

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 ) The introduction begins with an emotional appeal by describing a scene from the authors childhood. Put parenthesis around this. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ( ) Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 In this description there are great word choices.

Circle the metaphor in line 3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Bogard also uses a statistic in his introduction. Find and circle it. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 BillAtwood AtwoodCollins CollinsEducation EducationAssociates Associates Bill 2017

2017 Bogard ends the first part of his introduction with a call to action. Find and circle it. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 BillAtwood AtwoodCollins CollinsEducation EducationAssociates Associates Bill 2017 2017 Bogard uses additional emotional language (a verb) in his introduction in line 5. Circle this verb. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 BillAtwood AtwoodCollins CollinsEducation EducationAssociates Associates Bill 2017 2017 In line 12, Bogard ends this paragraph with a warning. Find and circle it. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 BillAtwood AtwoodCollins CollinsEducation EducationAssociates Associates Bill 2017 2017 Find and circle the word, solstice. There is a good context clue for this word. Put the context clue in parenthesis. 1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ( ) BillAtwood AtwoodCollins CollinsEducation EducationAssociates Associates Bill 2017 2017 There are 3 apostrophes in this piece. Find and circle them. Why are they used? 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 BillAtwood

AtwoodCollins CollinsEducation EducationAssociates Associates Bill 2017 2017 Bogard uses transitions very effectively in this piece. Find and circle the transition in line 3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 BillAtwood AtwoodCollins CollinsEducation EducationAssociates Associates Bill 2017 2017 There is other transitions in line 10 and 11, find and circle. 1 2 3 4 5 6

7 8 9 10 11 12 BillAtwood AtwoodCollins CollinsEducation EducationAssociates Associates Bill 2017 2017 Bogard uses subordinate clauses very well to add information and combine sentences. Find the 1st one in lines 3-5. (when) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ( ) BillAtwood AtwoodCollins CollinsEducation EducationAssociates Associates Bill

2017 2017 Bogard uses subordinate clauses very well to add information and combine sentences. Find the 2nd one in lines 6-7. (as) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ) BillAtwood AtwoodCollins CollinsEducation EducationAssociates Associates Bill 2017 2017 ( Bogard uses subordinate clauses very well to add information and combine sentences. Find the 3rd one in lines 10-11. (when) 1 2 3 4 5 6

7 8 9 10 11 12 ( ) BillAtwood AtwoodCollins CollinsEducation EducationAssociates Associates Bill 2017 2017 Mini Lesson 4: Building the interpretation by re-quoting a word and explaining Objective: After seeing the introduction to an essay students will practice subordinating a quotes and then adding a second sentence to re-quote a word or two and develop the meaning further. Steps: 1. Will read an introduction to an essay and after a quick write: what is good about this introduction. 2. Students will turn and talk while the teacher helps students identify features of the piece. 3. Then students will practice verbally subordinating a quote to show how the author builds his/her argument. 4. Students will practice adding a second sentence which requotes and develops the meaning of the quote more fully. 5. Closing task: students will complete two worksheets similar to the verbal practice exercises. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 What makes this an effective introduction to an essay arguing for more darkness at night? Write 7 lines or more. 3 minutes Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017

Quick Write (brainstorm) Grades 5-10 Name Date What is good about this introduction to the essay? The introduction is good because it is very descriptive telling about the amazing night sky and darkness in Minnesota. Also, it gives a powerful statistic that 8 out 10 children wont see a sky dark enough to see the milky way. Also the paragraph ends with a call to action, let us remember the irreplaceable value of darkness. The second part is good because it lays our another argument against artificial light by saying it spells trouble for all. Quick Write (brainstorm) Grades 5-10 Name Date Strengths of introduction: 1. Effective hook knew woods so dark, my hands disappeared before my eyes. 2. Vivid description of night sky, emotional appeal 3. Statistic 8 out of 10 4. Emotional appeal, I worry 5. Effective word choices: we cheer, but we should remember... Irreplaceable 6. Eternal rhythm of night sky and connecting to evolution sets stage for future argument of harmful effects of artificial light...spells trouble for all Claim: Paul Bogard introduces his argument about the need for darkness with vivid description of an amazing night skies in the past. Use a phrase that starts with By describing to join the quote and the interpretation. He writes, I knew night skies in which meteors left smoky trails across sugary spreads of stars. This quote evokes a strong yearning in the reader for an experience like this one.

By describing the night skies of his youth as ones where meteors left smoky trails across sugary spreads of stars, Bogard evokes a strong yearning in the reader. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Claim: Paul Bogard introduces his argument about the need for darkness with vivid description of an amazing night skies in the past. Now add a second sentence requoting a word or two and developing the meaning further. By describing the night skies of his youth as ones where meteors left smoky trails across sugary spreads of stars, Bogard evokes a strong yearning in the reader. The words smoky trails and sugary spreads of stars convey a sense of a great feast to be viewed by the eyes. This powerful language makes the reader want to have that experience-- to see what he has seen. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Claim: Paul Bogard uses an emotional appeal in his introduction. Use a verb phrase that starts with When to join the quote and the interpretation. He writes, I worry we are rapidly losing nights natural darkness without realizing its worth. This is an emotional appeal of anxiety, of not knowing what will happen in the future unless something changes. When he writes I worry we are rapidly losing nights natural darkness without realizing its worth, he plays on his audiences fear of the future making the reader as anxious as he is. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Claim: Paul Bogard uses an emotional appeal in his introduction. Now add a second sentence requoting a word or two and developing the meaning further. When he writes I worry we are rapidly losing nights natural darkness without realizing its worth, he plays on his audiences fear of the future making the reader as anxious as he is. The terms worry and natural are powerful word choices because people tend to fear the unnatural and worry about the consequences of

changing things from the way there are meant to be in nature. By using these terms, Bogart sets his audience up to learn the affects of losing darkness. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Claim: Paul Bogard concludes his introduction with a direct appeal to his audience. Use a subordinate clause that starts with When Bogard to join the quote and the interpretation. He writes, As we cheer the days gradual movement back to light, let us also remember the irreplaceable value of darkness. This quote shows how he appeals to the audience. When Bogard ends his introduction with, as we cheer the days gradual movement back to light, let us also remember the irreplaceable value of darkness he calls his audiences attention to the importance of darkness. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Claim: Paul Bogard concludes his introduction with a direct appeal to his audience. Now add a second sentence requoting a word or two and developing the meaning further. When Bogard ends his introduction with, as we cheer the days gradual movement back to light, let us also remember the irreplaceable value of darkness he calls his audiences attention to the importance of darkness. He suggests we cheer as daylight returns but remember the lost darkness to show that daylight is not the only valuable resource. He also uses the word irreplaceable value to imply a sense of urgency-once darkness is lost, it may never be recovered. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Claim: Paul Bogards organizes the next section of his essay around a claim is that too much artificial light spells trouble for all. Use a verb phrase that starts with Describing to join the quote and the interpretation.. He writes in the beginning of this section, All life evolved to the steady rhythm of bright days and dark nights. This shows that he

will make a scientific argument. Describing how all life evolved to the steady rhythm of bright days and dark nights, Bogart uses both scientific theory of evolution and the musical concept of rhythm. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Claim: Paul Bogards organizes the next section of his essay around a claim is that too much artificial light spells trouble for all. Now add a second sentence requoting a word or two and developing the meaning further. Describing how all life evolved to the steady rhythm of bright days and dark nights, Bogart uses both scientific theory of evolution and the musical concept of rhythm. The two words together, evolve and rhythm suggest a kind of natural order, something that should be repeated over and over again and can be repeated unless darkness is dropped from the human experience. This will lead to his case that darkness has been dropped from this important eternal pattern. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Subordinate the Quote! Improve the writing by joining the quote and interpretation into one sentence. 1. Bogard writes, I knew night skies in which meteors left smoky trails across sugary spreads of stars. This quote evokes a strong yearning in the reader for an experience like this one. (By describing) 2. He writes, I worry we are rapidly losing nights natural darkness without realizing its worth. This is an emotional appeal of anxiety, of not knowing what will happen in the future unless something changes. (When) 3. He writes, As we cheer the days gradual movement back to light, let us also remember the irreplaceable value of darkness. This quote shows how he appeals to the audience. (When) 4. He writes in the beginning of this section, All life evolved to the steady rhythm of bright days and dark nights. This shows that he will make a scientific argument. (Describing) Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 POSSIBLE ANSWER KEY

Subordinate the Quote! Improve the writing by joining the quote and interpretation into one sentence. 1. Bogard writes, I knew night skies in which meteors left smoky trails across sugary spreads of stars. This quote evokes a strong yearning in the reader for an experience like this one. (By describing) By describing the night skies of his youth as ones where meteors left smoky trails across sugary spreads of stars, Bogard evokes a strong yearning in the reader. 2. He writes, I worry we are rapidly losing nights natural darkness without realizing its worth. This is an emotional appeal of anxiety, of not knowing what will happen in the future unless something changes. (When) When he writes I worry we are rapidly losing nights natural darkness without realizing its worth, he plays on his audiences fear of the future making the reader as anxious as he is. 3. He writes, As we cheer the days gradual movement back to light, let us also remember the irreplaceable value of darkness. This quote shows how he appeals to the audience. (When) When Bogard ends his introduction with, as we cheer the days gradual movement back to light, let us also remember the irreplaceable value of darkness he calls his audiences attention to the importance of darkness. 4. He writes in the beginning of this section, All life evolved to the steady rhythm of bright days and dark nights. This shows that he will make a scientific argument. (Describing) Describing how all life evolved to the steady rhythm of bright days and dark nights, Bogart uses both scientific theory of evolution and the musical concept of rhythm to make his argument. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Re-Quote and Develop Add a second sentence which re-quotes words from previous sentence to develop the meaning further. 1. He remembers nights at a cabin on a Minnesota lake as one with skies where, meteors left smoky trails across sugary spreads of stars. This quotes shows Bogard uses language to evoke a desire for nature in the reader. 2. When he writes I worry we are rapidly losing nights natural darkness without realizing its worth, he plays on his audiences fear of the future making the reader as anxious as he is. 3. When Bogard ends his introduction with, as we cheer the days gradual movement back to light, let us also remember the irreplaceable value of darkness he calls his audiences attention to the importance of darkness. 4. Describing how all life evolved to the steady rhythm of bright days and dark nights, Bogart uses both scientific theory of evolution and the musical concept of rhythm to make his argument. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates

2017 Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017 Re-Quote and Develop Add a second sentence which re-quotes words from previous sentence to develop the meaning further. 1. He remembers nights at a cabin on a Minnesota lake as one with skies where, meteors left smoky trails across sugary spreads of stars. This quotes shows Bogard uses language to evoke a desire for nature in the reader. By using the words, smoky trails across sugary spreads of stars, Bogard evokes a strong desire in the reader. The language is powerful and primal pushing us to consider that nature may be as necessary as food. 2. When he writes I worry we are rapidly losing nights natural darkness without realizing its worth, he plays on his audiences fear of the future making the reader as anxious as he is. The terms worry and natural are powerful word choices because people tend to fear the unnatural and worry about the consequences of changes things from the way there are meant to be in nature. By using these terms, Bogart sets his audience up to learn the affects of losing darkness. 3. When Bogard ends his introduction with, as we cheer the days gradual movement back to light, let us also remember the irreplaceable value of darkness he calls his audiences attention to the importance of darkness. He suggests we cheer as daylight returns but remember the lost darkness to show that daylight is not the only valuable resource. He also uses the word irreplaceable value to imply a sense of urgency--once darkness is lost, it may never be recovered. 4. Describing how all life evolved to the steady rhythm of bright days and dark nights, Bogart uses both scientific theory of evolution and the musical concept of rhythm to make his argument. The two words together, evolve and rhythm suggest a kind of natural order, something that should be repeated over and over again. This will lead to his case that darkness has been dropped from this important eternal pattern. Bill Atwood Collins Education Associates 2017

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