幻灯片 1 - c9.wjxit.com

幻灯片 1 - c9.wjxit.com

Home Before Reading 1. English Poem -- Another Day in Paradise Read the Poem Discussion 2. English Song -- We Are the World Listen to the Song Blank Filling Questions about the Song and the Text Some Pioneers to Make a Brighter Day 3. Background Information O. Henry What are They Famous For? Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Read the Poem Before Reading

Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Discussion 1. What story does the poem tell us? 2. What would you do if you were the man in the poem, and why? Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Listen to the Song Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading

After Reading Home Blank Filling Listen to the song again and fill in the blanks with what you hear. There comes a time hear a certain call , When we_______________ When the world Must _____________ come together as one. There are people dying; And its time to ___________ lend a hand to life, The greatest gift of all. We cant go on pretending day by day That someone somewhere will soon _____________ Make a change . We are the part Of Gods great big family. And the truth you know, Love is __________ all we need . Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading

After Reading Home We are the world, We are the children, We are the ones Who make a brighter day. So lets start giving. Theres a choice we are making, We are saving our own lives. Its true well make a better day, Just you and me. Send them __________ your heart So theyll know that someone cares. And their life Will be______________ stronger and free . As God has shown us, By turning _____________ stones to bread So we all must lend a helping hand. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading

Home We are the world, We are the children, We are the ones Who make a brighter day. So lets start giving. Theres a choice we are making, We are saving our own lives. Its true well make a better day, Just you and me. ___________ When youre down and out , There seems no hope at all. But if you just believe, Theres _______________ no way we can fall . Let us realize That a change can only come When we _____________ stand together as one. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading

Home We are the world, We are the children, We are the ones Who make a brighter day. So lets start giving. Theres a choice we are making, We are saving our own lives. Its true well make a better day, Just you and me. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Questions about the Song and the Text 1. According to the song, among faith, hope and charity, which is the most important? Charity. 2. The story tells us that, to solve the problems of this world, Love is all we need. Do you think so? If not, what do we need to make

a brighter day? Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Some Pioneers to Make a Brighter Day Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Some Pioneers to Make a Brighter Day Mother Teresa Mother Teresa founded the Missionaries of Charity, an order ( ) of nuns, to help those who are starving and sick. Centered in Calcutta, India, one of the most densely populated cities in the world, the organizati

on also helps the impoverished children. Af ter four decades of service for the poor, Mo ther Teresa stepped down from her role as administrator of the order in 1990. She was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979. (http://almaz.com/nobel/peace/1979a.html) Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Some Pioneers to Make a Brighter Day Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home

Some Pioneers to Make a Brighter Day Princess Diana Diana actively supported many charities related to homeless and deprived children, drug abuse and victims of AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome). In 1987 Diana shocked many people when she shook the hand of an AIDS patient. She was the vice president of the British Red Cross and served as a member of International Red Cross advisory board. (http://www.gargaro. com/diana.html) Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Some Pioneers to Make a Brighter Day Michael Jackson Michael Jackson cowrote (with Lionel Richie) the song We Are the World (1985), which was performed by a grou p of more than 40 popular musicians, with all profits from

audio and video sales donated to alleviate world hunger. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home O.Henry (1862-1910): American writer of short stories, be st known for his ironic plot twists and surprise endings Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home He was born on September 11, 1862 in North Carolina, where he spent his childhood.

Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home He went to Texas in 1882 and worked at various jobs -- as a teller in an Austin bank (1891~1894) and as a newspaperman for the Houston Post. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Before Reading

In 1898 an unexplained shortage in the Austin bank was charged to him. Although many people believed him innocent, he fled to the Honduras, but then returned to be with his wife, who was fatally ill. He eventually served three years in prison, where he first started writing short stories. Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Before Reading Upon his release he settled in New York City and became a highly successful and prolific contributor to various magazines. Although his stories have been criticized as shallow and contrived, O. Henry did catch the color and movement of the city and evidenced a genuine sympathy for ordinary people. His

approximately 300 stories are collected in Cabbages and Kings (1904,http://www.classicsnetwork.co m/etexts/599/), The Four Million (1906,http://www.literaturepage.com /read/thefourmillion.html), The Voice of the City (1908), Options (1909), and others. Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home He died on June 5, 1910 in New York City at the age of forty-seven. An alcoholic, he died virtually penniless. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading

Home What are They Famous For? Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home What are They Famous For? Do you know these greatest artists and their masterpieces? Steven Spielberg (1947~ ): American motion-picture director, producer and executive, who achieved great commercial success and is among the most popular filmmakers of the late 20th century. Masterpieces: Schindlers List, Jurassic Park, Saving Private Rayn, etc. Before Reading

Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Schindlers List Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home What are They Famous For? Do you know these greatest artists and their masterpieces? Mozart (1756~1791): Austrian composer, the centrally important composer of the classical era, and one of the most inspired composers in the Western musical tradition

Masterpieces: Symphony No.40 in G minor (G 40 ) Variations on Ah, vous diraije, Maman ( ) Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home What are They Famous For? Do you know these greatest artists and their masterpieces? Xu Beihong (1895~1953): Modern Chinese master of Fine Arts ( ) Masterpieces: Horses Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading

Home Xu Beihongs Horses Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home What are They Famous For? Do you know these greatest artists and their masterpieces? Pablo Picasso (1881~1973): Spanish painter and sculptor, generally considered the greatest artist in the 20th century Masterpieces: The Barefoot Girl, Self-portrait, etc. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading

After Reading Home The barefoot girl Before Reading Global Reading Self-portrait Detailed Reading After Reading Home What are They Famous For? Do you know these greatest artists and their masterpieces? Leonardo Da Vinci (1452~1519): Florentine artist, one of the great masters of High Renaissance ( ), celebrated as painter, sculptor, architect, engineer and scientist Masterpieces: Mona Lisa, The Last Supper, etc.

Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Mona Lisa Before Reading Global Reading The Last Supper Detailed Reading After Reading Home What are They Famous For? Do you know these greatest artists and their masterpieces? Ralph Lauren (1939~ ): American fashion designer, the founder of the clothing company called Polo. Masterpieces:

Before Reading clothing for men, women and children, bedding and bath luxuries, gifts and much more Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home What are They Famous For? Do you know these greatest artists and their masterpieces? Wang Xizhi (303~379): Wang Xizhi is known as the Sage of C alligraphy ( ). He is remembered n ot only for revolutionizing the art of Chi nese writing, but also for his complete devotion to this traditional Chinese art f orm. Masterpieces:

Before Reading Lan Ting Xu (the Prelude of the Orchid Pavilion), etc. Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Lan Ting Xu Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home What are They Famous For? Do you know these greatest artists and their masterpieces? William Shakespeare (1564~1616): English playwright and poet, recognized in much of the world as

the greatest of all dramatists Masterpieces: Before Reading As You Like It, Othello, Macbeth, King Lear, Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, Merchant of Venice, Midsummer Nights Dream, Twelfth Night, etc. Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Merchant of Venice Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home

Global Reading 1. Part Division of the Text 2. Questions and Answers 3. Scanning 4. Further Understanding Before Reading For Parts 1 & 2 Story Telling For Parts 3 & 4 Dialogue Making For Parts 5, 6 & 7 Discussion Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Part Division of the Text A piece of narration usually consists of a number of

scenes. In each scene there are different characters who interact with each other. Now put down, in the following table, the characters and major events of the seven scenes in Text A. The first one has been done for you. Parts Lines Characters Sues roommate Johnsy ca ught pneumonia. 1 1~10 2 The doctor told Sue that J 11~25 the doctor, Sue ohnsy needed a strong will t o live on. Before Reading Sue, Johnsy Events Global Reading

Detailed Reading After Reading Home Part Division of the Text A piece of narration usually consists of a number of scenes. In each scene there are different characters who interact with each other. Now put down, in the following table, the characters and major events of the seven scenes in Text A. The first one has been done for you. Parts Lines 3 26~53 4 54~80 Before Reading Characters Johnsy, Sue Events Johnsy decided that she

would die when the last ivy leaf fell. Sue told Behrman about J Behrman, Sue ohnsys fancy. Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Part Division of the Text A piece of narration usually consists of a number of scenes. In each scene there are different characters who interact with each other. Now put down, in the following table, the characters and major events of the seven scenes in Text A. The first one has been done for you. Parts Lines 5 81~105 Before Reading Characters

Sue, Johnsy Global Reading Events As Johnsy was encourag ed by the last leaf that would nt give in to the weather, he r will to live returned. Detailed Reading After Reading Home Part Division of the Text A piece of narration usually consists of a number of scenes. In each scene there are different characters who interact with each other. Now put down, in the following table, the characters and major events of the seven scenes in Text A. The first one has been done for you. Parts Lines 6 106~116 Before Reading

Characters Events The doctor told Sue th the doctor, Sue at Johnsy would recover, but Behrman caught pneu monia himself and his cas e was hopeless. Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Part Division of the Text A piece of narration usually consists of a number of scenes. In each scene there are different characters who interact with each other. Now put down, in the following table, the characters and major events of the seven scenes in Text A. The first one has been done for you. Parts Lines 7

116~129 Before Reading Characters Sue, Johnsy Global Reading Events Sue told Johnsy that Be hrman had performed a kind deed without any thought of self. Detailed Reading After Reading Home Questions and Answers The story is, as indicated by its title, built around the last ivy leaf. In other words, the last ivy leaf is the main thread that runs through the whole story. The following questions are intended to help you get a clear idea of this point. 1. What was, at first, Johnsy determined to do if the last ivy leaf should fall? She made up her mind to die when the last leaf fell. 2. What did she decide to do when she saw the last leaf still cling to the vine after two nights rain and wind?

She decided not to give up her life. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Questions and Answers The story is, as indicated by its title, built around the last ivy leaf. In other words, the last ivy leaf is the main thread that runs through the whole story. The following questions are intended to help you get a clear idea of this point. 3. How was it that the cold fierce wind did not blow away the last leaf? Behrman, a kind neighbor, who was aware of Johnsys stat e of mind, risked death to paint the last leaf and save her. 4. Why did Sue call the painted leaf Behrmans masterpiece ? Because it was so perfect the girls both mistook it for the real thing. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading

After Reading Home Scanning Scan Text A and find out other clues besides the last ivy leaf, which help organize the story into a whole. Clue 1: the last leaf Clue 2: the doctors three visits Clue 3: soup Clue 4: the Bay of Naples Clue 5: Behrmans masterpiece Before Reading Global Reading

Detailed Reading After Reading Home Scanning Scan Text A and find out other clues besides the last ivy leaf, which help organize the story into a whole. Clue 1: Clue 2: Clue 3: Clue 4: Clue 5: last leaf 1.the Johnsy was seriously ill. (LL. 11~23) 2.the Johnsy hadthree a 50-50 chance for survival and doctors visits death while Old Behrman was incurably sick. soup (LL. 106~114) 3.the Johnsy

was sure to recover. (LL. 115~116) Bay of Naples Behrmans masterpiece Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Scanning Scan Text A and find out other clues besides the last ivy leaf, which help organize the story into a whole. Clue 1: Clue 2: Clue 3: Clue 4: Clue 5: last leaf 1.the Johnsy refused to take any soup when she die with the fall of the last leaf.

thedecided doctorstothree visits (LL. 44~47) 2.soup When she was shaken alive again by that undying leaf, one of her first desires was the Bay oflast Naples to drink some soup. (L. 101) Behrmans masterpiece Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Scanning Scan Text A and find out other clues besides the last ivy leaf, which help organize the story into a whole. Clue 1: Clue 2: Clue 3:

last leaf 1.theBefore she fell ill, Johnsy had wished to paint Bay ofthree Naples. (L. 16) thethe doctors visits 2. Inspired by the last leaf, Johnsy again looked soup forward to painting it. (L. 105) Clue 4: the Bay of Naples Clue 5: Behrmans masterpiece Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home

Scanning Scan Text A and find out other clues besides the last ivy leaf, which help organize the story into a whole. Clue 1: Clue 2: Clue 3: Clue 4: Clue 5: lastBehrman leaf 1.theOld was a failure in art. He had always talked about the doctors three visitsa masterpiece, yet he wa s unable to deliver it. (LL. 56~58) 2.soup Someday I will paint a masterpiece, and we away. (LL. 73~74) theshall Bayall ofgo Naples 3. Finally, Old Behrman painted his masterpiece Behrmans at the costmasterpiece

of his life. (LL. 119~128) Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home For Parts 1 & 2 Story Telling Suppose you are Sue, tell us in the first person a story which may cover the following points: 1. How did Johnsy and you meet. 2. How did she get ill. 3. What did the doctor tell you about Johnsys illness. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home

For Parts 3 & 4 Dialogue Making Make a dialogue between Sue and Behrman according to the sentence She told him of Johnsys fancy, and how she feared she would, indeed, light and fragile as a leaf herself, float away, when her slight hold upon the world grew weaker in Lines 65 to 68. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home For Parts 5, 6 & 7 Discussion 1. What encouraged Johnsy to regain the will to live and how ? 2. What do you think Johnsy Mr. Behrman

had done forwould her? react after realizing what Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home After Reading 1. Useful Expressions 2. Word Formation 3. Debate 4. Dictation 5. Writing Practice -- The General-to-Specific Pattern Introduction An Example Homework 6.Talk about the Pictures 7. Proverbs and Quotations Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading

After Reading Home Useful Expressions 1. here and there 2. one chance in ten 3. drawing board 4. whistle a merry tune 5. count backward Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading

After Reading Home Useful Expressions 6. in almost a whisper 7. hear of 8. get well 9. ten to one 10. be tired of Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading

After Reading Home Useful Expressions 11. turn loose ones hold on everything 12. look the part 13. drink to excess 14. for the rest 15. mock terribly at Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading

After Reading Home Useful Expressions 16. peer at/stare at 17. an upturned kettle 18. stand out 19. wear away 20. cling to Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading

After Reading Home Useful Expressions 21. be out of danger 22. be wet through Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Word Formation What do you call the people who perform or create these arts? sculpture sculptor/sculptress dance

dancer poetry poet/poetess drama/acting dramatist/actor/actress painting painter/artist music musician Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Word Formation fashion design

fashion designer movie making movie maker/director short stories (short story) writer/author novels novelist photography photographer cartoons/animation cartoonist/animator Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home

Debate Many years ago, a college student lost his life to save an ol d farmers life, which aroused a heated discussion among peopl e. Some thought that it was not worthwhile for a college student who might contribute a lot to the society in the future to risk dea th for an old life, while some other people held the opposite vie w. What is your opinion? Make a debate about whether it was worthwhile for Old Behrman to risk death to save Johnsys life? Tips: Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Supporting arguments 1. It is the only way to save her life. 2. It is worthwhile for the old to risk death to save the youngs lives. Opposing arguments 1. Behrman could try other means to save Johnsys life instead of sacrificing himself. 2. Both the olds and the youngs lives are valuable.

Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Dictation Listen to a short passage about Princess Diana and her charity work and fill in the blanks. The metamorphosis ( ) came the day in April 1987 whe n Diana opened Britains first purpose-built ward ( ) for AID _________ sufferers S protective , at Londons Middlesex Hospital.__________ Many were _________ average shocked at the fact that she didnt wear any cl othing. At that time the Briton ( ) knew very li _______ touch kissing it could be ________

huggingand ttle about AIDS. Some _______ believed caught passed on by _________ , , or even infected ______ royal who was someone . The revelation ( ) tha ________ ta , like Princess Diana, the mother of two young sons enormous ________ deadly , had taken such an risk with a disease s hocked many people. Before Reading Global Reading

Detailed Reading After Reading Home Introduction The general-to-specific pattern is probably one of the common patterns in college writing. It may be used in any of these familiar places: Introduction to a paper Background in a research paper Opening paragraphs for a discussion or an analysis As the name suggests, this pattern is characterized by a movement in your thinking from a generalization to specific details. Your opening paragraph would begin with a general statement and then add details that explain it. The details may continue to become increasingly more specific. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home An Example Example of a General-to-Specific Pattern

Writing is a complex sociocognitive process involving the construction of recorded messages on paper or on some oth er material, and, more recently, on a computer screen. The fi rst skill area involves acquiring a writing system, which may be alphabetic (as in European languages) or nonalphabetic (as in many Asian languages). The second skill area requires selecting the appropriate grammar and vocabulary to form ac ceptable sentences and then arranging them in paragraphs. Third, writing involves thinking about the purpose of the text t o be composed and about its possible effects on the intende d readership. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home An Example Example of a General-to-Specific Pattern Writing is a complex sociocognitive process involving the construction of recorded messages on paper or on some oth er material, and, more recently, a computer In this

example, theon first sentence screen. presentsThe fi rst skill area writing theinvolves general acquiring statementaabout thesystem, writing which may be alphabetic (as inThe European languages) or nonalphabetic process. succeeding statements consist (as in manyofAsian languages). The second skillby area details and examples, introduced therequires selecting the

appropriate to form ac transitions first,grammar second, and and vocabulary third. ceptable sentences and then arranging them in paragraphs. Third, writing involves thinking about the purpose of the text t o be composed and about its possible effects on the intende d readership. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home An Example Example of a General-to-Specific Pattern This paragraph could have introduced a longer paper in which the writer discusses the kinds of training needed to learn to write, analyzes the results of a study about learning to write, or even introduces a topical literature review about teaching writing. You can see that the general-to-specific pattern is one you will use frequently because of its versatility as well as its

obvious ability to quickly and effectively introduce your readers to your ideas. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Homework Write a paragraph about your impressions of the story The Last Leaf, using the general-to-specific pattern. Model: The Spirit of Kindness The most touching thing about the story The Last Leaf is the way in which it captures the very best in humanity, the spirit of kindness. This it does through what seems at first sight an unlucky hero. The old artist appears to be a nononsense character, one without any time for sentimentality and softness. Yet we soon see his kindly nature peeping through his rough manner. Only at the end of the story, however, do we discover how kind and considerate he was, the old man risking death to save the girl. Before Reading

Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Talk about the Pictures Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Talk about the Pictures Click the picture to return Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading

Home Talk about the Pictures Click the picture to return Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Talk about the Pictures Click the picture to return Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Talk about the Pictures Click the picture to return

Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Talk about the Pictures Click the picture to return Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Talk about the Pictures Click the picture to return Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading

After Reading Home Proverbs and Quotations 1. Charity begins at home, but should not end there. 2. Charity covers a multitude of sins. / 3. Three helping one another bear the burden of six. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Proverbs and Quotations 4. One hand washes another. 5. Love has no meaning if it isnt shared. Love has to be put

into action. -- Mother Teresa, Roman Catholic nun Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home THE LAST LEAF At the top of a three-story brick building, Sue and Johnsy had their studio. Johnsy was familiar for Joanna. One was from Mai ne; the other from California. They had met at a cafe on Eighth Street and found their ta stes in art, chicory salad and bishop sleeve s so much in tune that the joint studio result ed. That was in May. In November a cold, unseen stranger, w hom the doctors called Pneumonia, stalked about the district , touching one here and there with his icy fingers. Johnsy wa s among his victims. Before Reading

Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home She lay, scarcely moving on her bed, looking through the small window at the blank side of the next brick house. One morning the busy doctor invited Sue into the hallway with a bushy, gray eyebrow. She has one chance in ten, he said. And that chance is for her to want to live. Your little lady has made up her mind that shes not going to get well. Has she anything on her mind? She -- she wanted to paint the Bay of Naples some day, said Sue. Paint? -- bosh! Has she anything on her mind worth thinking about twice -- a man, for instance? Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home

A man? said Sue. Is a man worth -- but, no, doctor; there is nothing of the kind. Well, said the doctor. I will do all that science can accomp lish. But whenever my patient begins to count the carriages in her funeral procession I subtract 50 per cent from the curative power of medicines. After the doctor had gone Sue went int o the workroom and cried. Then she marched into Johnsys r oom with her drawing board, whistling a merry tune. Johnsy lay, scarcely making a movement under the bedclot hes, with her face toward the window. She was looking out an d counting -- counting backward. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Twelve, she said, and a little later eleven; and then ten, and nine; and then eight and seven, almost together. Sue looked out of the window. What was there to count? There was only a bare, dreary yard to be seen, and the blank side of the brick house twenty feet away. An old, old ivy vine climbed half way up the brick wall. The cold breath of autumn had

blown away its leaves, leaving it almost bare. Six, said Johnsy, in almost a whisper. Theyre falling fast er now. Three days ago there were almost a hundred. It made my headache to count them. But now its easy. There goes an other one. There are only five left now. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Five what, dear? Leaves. On the ivy vine. When the last one falls I must go, too. Ive known that for three days. Didnt the doctor tell you? Oh, I never heard of such nonsense. What have old ivy leaves to do with your getting well? Dont be so silly. Why, the doctor told me this morning that your ch ances for getting well real soon were ten to one! Try to take some soup now, and l et Sudie go and buy port wine for her sic k child. You neednt get any more wine, said Johnsy, keeping h er eyes fixed out the window. There goes another. No, I do

nt want any soup. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home That leaves just four. I want to see the last one fall before it gets dark. Then Ill go, too. Im tired of waiting. Im tired of thin king. I want to turn loose my hold on everything, and go sailin g down, down, just like one of those poor, tired leaves. Try to sleep, said Sue. I must call Behrman up to be my model for the old miner. Ill not be gone a minute. Old Behrman was a painter who lived on the ground floor b eneath them. He was past sixty and had a long white beard c urling down over his chest. Despite looking the part, Behrman was a failure in art. For forty years he had been always about to paint a masterpiece, but had never yet begun it. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading

Home He earned a little by serving as a model to those young arti sts who could not pay the price of a professional. He drank gi n to excess, and still talked of his coming masterpiece. For th e rest he was a fierce little old man, who mocked terribly at so ftness in any one, and who regarded himself as guard dog to t he two young artists in the studio above. Sue found Behrman smelling strongly of gin in his dimly ligh ted studio below. In one corner was a blank canvas on an eas el that had been waiting there for twenty-five years to receive t he first line of the masterpiece. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home She told him of Johnsys fancy, and how she feared she would, indeed, ligh t and fragile as a leaf herself, float awa y, when her slight hold upon the world grew weaker. Old Behrman, with his re d eyes plainly streaming, shouted his c ontempt for such foolish imaginings.

What! he cried. Are there people in the world foolish enou gh to die because leafs drop off from a vine? I have never hea rd of such a thing. Why do you allow such silly ideas to come i nto that head of hers? God! This is not a place in which one so good as Miss Johnsy should lie sick. Some day I will paint a m asterpiece, and we shall all go away. Yes. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Johnsy was sleeping when they went upstairs. Sue pulled t he shade down, and motioned Behrman into the other room. I n there they peered out the window fearfully at the ivy vine. T hen they looked at each other for a moment without speaking. A persistent, cold rain was falling, mingled with snow. Behrma n, in his old blue shirt, took his seat as the miner on an upturn ed kettle for a rock. When Sue awoke from an hours sleep the next morning sh e found Johnsy with dull, wide-open eyes staring at the drawn green shade. Pull it up; I want to see, she ordered, in a whisper. Wearily Sue obeyed. Before Reading

Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home But, Lo! after the beating rain and fierce wind that had endured through the night, there yet stood out against the brick wall one ivy leaf. It was the last on the vine. Still dark green near its stem, but with its edges colored yellow, it hung bravely from a branch some twenty feet above the ground. It is the last one, said Johnsy. I thought it would surely fal l during the night. I heard the wind. It will fall today, and I shall die at the same time. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home

The day wore away, and even through the twilight they c ould see the lone ivy leaf clinging to its stem against the wal l. And then, with the coming of the night the north wind was again loosed. When it was light enough Johnsy, the merciless, comman ded that the shade be raised. The ivy leaf was still there. Johnsy lay for a long time looking at it. And then she calle d to Sue, who was stirring her chicken soup over the gas st ove. Ive been a bad girl, Sudie, said Johnsy. Something ha s made that last leaf stay there to show me how wicked I wa s. It is a sin to want to die. You may bring me a little soup n ow, and some milk with a little port in it and -- no; bring me a hand-mirror first, and then pack some pillows about me, a nd I will sit up and watch you cook. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home An hour later she said: Sudie, some day I hope to paint the Bay of Naples. The doctor came in the afternoon, and Sue had an excu

se to go into the hallway as he left. Even chances, said the doctor, taking Sues thin, shakin g hand in his. With good nursing youll win. And now I must see another case I have downstairs. Behrman, his name is --some kind of an artist, I believe. Pneumonia, too. He is an old, weak m an, and the attack is acute. There is no hope for him; but he goes to the hospital today to be made more comfortable. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home The next day the doctor said to Sue: Shes out of danger. Youve won. The right food and care now -- thats all. And that afternoon Sue came to the bed where Johnsy lay and put one arm around her. I have something to tell you, white mouse, she said. Mr. Behrman died of pneumonia today in the hospital. He was ill o nly two days. He was found on the morning of the first day in his room downstairs helpless with pain. His shoes and clothin g were wet through and icy cold. They couldnt imagine where he had been on such a terrible night. And then they found a la ntern, still lighted, and a ladder that had been dragged from it s place, and some scattered brushes, and a palette with gree

n and yellow colors mixed on it, and -- look out the window, d ear, at the last ivy leaf on the wall. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Didnt you wonder why it never fluttered or moved when t he wind blew? Ah, darling, its Behrmans masterpiece -- he painted it there the night that the last leaf fell. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home THE LAST LEAF At the top of a three-story brick building, Paraphrase the sentence. Sue and Johnsy had their studio. Johnsy

was familiar for Joanna. One was from Mai Johnsy was a pet name for Joanna. ne; the other from California. They had met at a cafe on Eighth StreetClose and found their ta stes in art, chicory salad and bishop sleeve s so much in tune that the joint studio result ed. That was in May. In November a cold, unseen stranger, w hom the doctors called Pneumonia, stalked about the district , touching one here and there with his icy fingers. Johnsy wa s among his victims. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home THE LAST LEAF At the top of a three-story brick building, Johnsy from Mai

ne; the other from California. They had met at a cafe on Eighth Street and found their ta stes in art, chicory salad and bishop sleeve s so much in tune that the joint studio result 2. Why did the joint studio come into being? Because the two girlsed. have so many things in common. That was in May. In November a cold, unseen stranger, w Close hom the doctors called Pneumonia, stalked about the district , touching one here and there with his icy fingers. Johnsy wa s among his victims. 1. What are chicory salad and bishop Sue and Johnsy had their studio. sleeves? The pictures show what chicory salad and bishop sleeves are.was familiar for Joanna. One was Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home THE LAST LEAF

At the top of a three-story brick building, Sue and Johnsy had their studio. Johnsy Personification . familiar for with Joanna. 2. What does touchingwas one here and there his icy One fingerswas from Mai mean? ne; the other from California. They had met It means the illness spread quicklyon from one toStreet another.and found their ta at a cafe Eighth 3. What does victims mean stes here? in art, chicory salad and bishop sleeve s so much in the tune that the joint studio result The victims were those who had got

illness. ed. Close That was in May. In November a cold, unseen stranger, w hom the doctors called Pneumonia, stalked about the district , touching one here and there with his icy fingers. Johnsy wa s among his victims. 1. What kind of rhetorical method is used here? Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home A man? said Sue. Is a man worth -- but, no, doctor; there is nothing of the kind. 1. Translate the sentence into Chinese. Well, said the doctor. I will do all that science can accomp lish. But whenever my patient begins to count the carriages in 2. What can you infer from sentence? herthe

funeral procession I subtract 50 per cent from the curative Johnsy was seriously power ill. The doctor held out little hope of medicines. Afterforthe doctor had gone Sue went int her because she seemed to lose the will to hang on to life. o the workroom and cried. Then she marched into Johnsys r oom with her drawing board, whistling a merry tune. Johnsy lay, scarcely making a movement under the bedclot Close hes, with her face toward the window. She was looking out an d counting -- counting backward. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home That leaves just four. I want to see the last one fall before it gets dark. Then Ill go, too. Im tired of waiting. Im tired of thin What is the meaning of the sentence? king. I want to turn loose my hold on everything, and go sailin I will be back in a few

g minutes. down, down, just like one of those poor, tired leaves. Try to sleep, said Sue. I must call Behrman up to be my Close model for the old miner. Ill not be gone a minute. Old Behrman was a painter who lived on the ground floor b eneath them. He was past sixty and had a long white beard c urling down over his chest. Despite looking the part, Behrman was a failure in art. For forty years he had been always about to paint a masterpiece, but had never yet begun it. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home He earned a little by serving as a model to those young arti sts mocked who could not pay theinprice 1. Judging from the phrase terribly at softness any one, what kind of person was Mr. Behrman?

of a professional. He drank gi n to excess, and still talked of his coming masterpiece. For th Mr. Behrman was a kind of person who laughed greatly at e rest heinwas a him. fierce little old man, who mocked terribly at so anyone who showed weakness front of 2. How is the characteristic of his in the ftness inillustrated any one, andfollowing who regarded himself as guard dog to t text? When hearing of Johnsys fancy, and how she feared wo he two young artists in theshe studio above. uld, light and fragile as a leaf herself, float away, he, with his

red eyes plainly streaming, shouted hisBehrman contempt forsmelling such fool strongly of gin in his dimly ligh Sue found ish imaginings. ted studio below. In one corner was a blank canvas on an eas Close el that had been waiting there for twenty-five years to receive t he first line of the masterpiece. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home But, Lo! after the beating rain and fierce wind that had endured 1. What does endure mean? It means continue. through the night, there yet stood out against

the through brick the wall one ivy 2. What is the function of that had endured night? leaf. It to was thethe lastbeating on the vine. Still It is an attributive clause used modify rain and fierce wind. dark green near its stem, but with 3. What is the subject ofits theedges whole sentence? colored yellow, it hung The subject is one ivybravely leaf . The mainasentence in inver twenty from branchissome sion due to the fronting ( ) of there. feet above the ground. Close "It is the last one," said Johnsy. "I thought it would surely fal

l during the night. I heard the wind. It will fall today, and I shall die at the same time." Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home An hour later she said: Sudie, some day I hope to paint the Bay of Naples. 1. What does even here mean? The doctor came in the afternoon, and Sue had an excu It means (of amounts, distances, values) equal. se to go into the hallway as he left. 2. Paraphrase the sentence. Even chances, She has equal chances for survival and death. said the doctor, taking Sues thin, shakin g hand in his. Close With good nursing youll win. And now I must see another case I have downstairs. Behrman, his name is --some kind of an artist, I believe. Pneumonia, too. He is an old, weak m an, and the attack is acute. There is no hope for him; but he

goes to the hospital today to be made more comfortable. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home THE LAST LEAF At the top of a three-story brick building, Sue and Johnsy had their studio. Johnsy was familiar for Joanna. One was from Mai ne; the other from California. They had met at a cafe on Eighth Street and found their ta stes in art, chicory salad and bishop sleeve s so much in tune that the joint studio result ed. That was in May. In November a cold, unseen stranger, w hom the doctors called Pneumonia, stalked about the district , touching one here and there with his icy fingers. Johnsy wa s among his victims. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading

After Reading Home She lay, scarcely moving on her bed, looking through the small window at the blank side of the next brick house. One morning the busy doctor invited Sue into the hallway with a bushy, gray eyebrow. She has one chance in ten, he said. And that chance is for her to want to live. Your little lady has made up her mind that shes not going to get well. Has she anything on her mind? She -- she wanted to paint the Bay of Naples some day, said Sue. Paint? -- bosh! Has she anything on her mind worth thinking about twice -- a man, for instance? Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home A man? said Sue. Is a man worth -- but, no, doctor; there is nothing of the kind. Well, said the doctor. I will do all that science can accomp

lish. But whenever my patient begins to count the carriages in her funeral procession I subtract 50 per cent from the curative power of medicines. After the doctor had gone Sue went int o the workroom and cried. Then she marched into Johnsys r oom with her drawing board, whistling a merry tune. Johnsy lay, scarcely making a movement under the bedclot hes, with her face toward the window. She was looking out an d counting -- counting backward. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Twelve, she said, and a little later eleven; and then ten, and nine; and then eight and seven, almost together. Sue looked out of the window. What was there to count? There was only a bare, dreary yard to be seen, and the blank side of the brick house twenty feet away. An old, old ivy vine climbed half way up the brick wall. The cold breath of autumn had blown away its leaves, leaving it almost bare. Six, said Johnsy, in almost a whisper. Theyre falling fast

er now. Three days ago there were almost a hundred. It made my headache to count them. But now its easy. There goes an other one. There are only five left now. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Five what, dear? Leaves. On the ivy vine. When the last one falls I must go, too. Ive known that for three days. Didnt the doctor tell you? Oh, I never heard of such nonsense. What have old ivy leaves to do with your getting well? Dont be so silly. Why, the doctor told me this morning that your ch ances for getting well real soon were ten to one! Try to take some soup now, and l et Sudie go and buy port wine for her sic k child. You neednt get any more wine, said Johnsy, keeping h er eyes fixed out the window. There goes another. No, I do nt want any soup. Before Reading

Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home That leaves just four. I want to see the last one fall before it gets dark. Then Ill go, too. Im tired of waiting. Im tired of thin king. I want to turn loose my hold on everything, and go sailin g down, down, just like one of those poor, tired leaves. Try to sleep, said Sue. I must call Behrman up to be my model for the old miner. Ill not be gone a minute. Old Behrman was a painter who lived on the ground floor b eneath them. He was past sixty and had a long white beard c urling down over his chest. Despite looking the part, Behrman was a failure in art. For forty years he had been always about to paint a masterpiece, but had never yet begun it. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home

He earned a little by serving as a model to those young arti sts who could not pay the price of a professional. He drank gi n to excess, and still talked of his coming masterpiece. For th e rest he was a fierce little old man, who mocked terribly at so ftness in any one, and who regarded himself as guard dog to t he two young artists in the studio above. Sue found Behrman smelling strongly of gin in his dimly ligh ted studio below. In one corner was a blank canvas on an eas el that had been waiting there for twenty-five years to receive t he first line of the masterpiece. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home She told him of Johnsys fancy, and how she feared she would, indeed, ligh t and fragile as a leaf herself, float awa y, when her slight hold upon the world grew weaker. Old Behrman, with his re d eyes plainly streaming, shouted his c ontempt for such foolish imaginings. What! he cried. Are there people in the world foolish enou gh to die because leafs drop off from a vine? I have never hea rd of such a thing. Why do you allow such silly ideas to come i

nto that head of hers? God! This is not a place in which one so good as Miss Johnsy should lie sick. Some day I will paint a m asterpiece, and we shall all go away. Yes. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Johnsy was sleeping when they went upstairs. Sue pulled t he shade down, and motioned Behrman into the other room. I n there they peered out the window fearfully at the ivy vine. T hen they looked at each other for a moment without speaking. A persistent, cold rain was falling, mingled with snow. Behrma n, in his old blue shirt, took his seat as the miner on an upturn ed kettle for a rock. When Sue awoke from an hours sleep the next morning sh e found Johnsy with dull, wide-open eyes staring at the drawn green shade. Pull it up; I want to see, she ordered, in a whisper. Wearily Sue obeyed. Before Reading Global Reading

Detailed Reading After Reading Home But, Lo! after the beating rain and fierce wind that had endured through the night, there yet stood out against the brick wall one ivy leaf. It was the last on the vine. Still dark green near its stem, but with its edges colored yellow, it hung bravely from a branch some twenty feet above the ground. It is the last one, said Johnsy. I thought it would surely fal l during the night. I heard the wind. It will fall today, and I shall die at the same time. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home The day wore away, and even through the twilight they c ould see the lone ivy leaf clinging to its stem against the wal

l. And then, with the coming of the night the north wind was again loosed. When it was light enough Johnsy, the merciless, comman ded that the shade be raised. The ivy leaf was still there. Johnsy lay for a long time looking at it. And then she calle d to Sue, who was stirring her chicken soup over the gas st ove. Ive been a bad girl, Sudie, said Johnsy. Something ha s made that last leaf stay there to show me how wicked I wa s. It is a sin to want to die. You may bring me a little soup n ow, and some milk with a little port in it and -- no; bring me a hand-mirror first, and then pack some pillows about me, a nd I will sit up and watch you cook. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home An hour later she said: Sudie, some day I hope to paint the Bay of Naples. The doctor came in the afternoon, and Sue had an excu se to go into the hallway as he left. Even chances, said the doctor, taking Sues thin, shakin g hand in his.

With good nursing youll win. And now I must see another case I have downstairs. Behrman, his name is --some kind of an artist, I believe. Pneumonia, too. He is an old, weak m an, and the attack is acute. There is no hope for him; but he goes to the hospital today to be made more comfortable. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Didnt you wonder why it never fluttered or moved when t he wind blew? Ah, darling, its Behrmans masterpiece -- he painted it there the night that the last leaf fell. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home THE LAST LEAF

At the top of a three-story brick building, Sue and Johnsy had their studio. Johnsy was familiar for Joanna. One was from Mai ne; the other from California. They had met at a cafe on Eighth Street and found their ta stes in art, chicory salad and bishop sleeve s so much in tune that the joint studio result ed. That was in May. In November a cold, unseen stranger, w hom the doctors called Pneumonia, stalked about the district , touching one here and there with his icy fingers. Johnsy wa s among his victims. Sentence Before Reading Word Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home THE LAST LEAF At the top of a three-story brick building, Sue and Johnsy had their studio. Johnsy in tune: harmonious(ly) (often followed by with) was familiar for Joanna. One was from Mai

S ne; the other from California. They had met T His ideas were in tune with mine. at a cafe on Eighth Street and found their ta S The price of gold coins fluctuates ) in tune with that stes in art,( chicory salad ando bishop sleeve f s so much in tune that the joint studio result commodities. Collocation: ed. out of tune with That was in May. In November a cold, unseen stranger, w change ones tune hom the doctors called Pneumonia, stalked about the district Close with his icy fingers. Johnsy wa , touching one here and there s among his victims.

Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home THE LAST LEAF At the top of a three-story brick building, Sue and Johnsy had their studio. Johnsy joint: adj. held or done by two or more persons together was familiar for Joanna. One was from Mai S She had taken the money out of the joint account she ne; the other from California. They had met had with her husband. at a cafe on Eighth Street and found their ta There are a number of different of business stes in art, forms chicory salad and bishop sleeve ownership, such as partnerships, corporations and s so much in tune that the joint studio result joint ventures. ed. That was in May. In November

a cold, unseen stranger, w Close hom the doctors called Pneumonia, stalked about the district , touching one here and there with his icy fingers. Johnsy wa s among his victims. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home THE LAST LEAF At the top of a three-story brick building, Sue and Johnsy had their studio. Johnsy stalk: v. (of an evil force) move through (a place) in a was familiar One was from Mai threatening way; move quietly for andJoanna. cautiously in order to get near ne; the other from California. They had met

S Fear stalks every dark atstairwell a cafeand on walkway. Eighth Street and found their ta stes in art, chicory salad and bishop sleeve S s so much in tune that the joint studio result T There are sharks stalking their ed. prey in those waters. That was in May. In November a cold, unseen stranger, w hom the doctors called Pneumonia, stalked about the district Close with his icy fingers. Johnsy wa , touching one here and there s among his victims. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home THE LAST LEAF At the top of a three-story brick building, Sue and Johnsy had their studio. Johnsy here and there: in various places

was familiar for Joanna. One was from Mai We went here andne; there looking berries. the otherforfrom California. They had met at a cafe on Eighth Street and found their ta S stes in art, chicory salad and bishop sleeve T The country is barren, with here and there a fertile spot. s so much in tune that the joint studio result ed. That was in May. In November a cold, unseen stranger, w Close hom the doctors called Pneumonia, stalked about the district , touching one here and there with his icy fingers. Johnsy wa s among his victims. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home

THE LAST LEAF At the top of a three-story brick building, Sue and Johnsy had their studio. Johnsy victim: n. person, animal, etc. suffering death, injury or loss was familiar for Joanna. One was from Mai S Four people were killed the explosion, ne;inthe other from California. They had met but the police have not yet named the at a cafe on Eighth Street and found their ta victims. stes in art, chicory salad and bishop sleeve S Thousands were victims of the plague in s so much in tune that the joint studio result the Middle Ages. ed. That was in May. In November a cold, unseen stranger, w hom the doctors called Pneumonia, stalked about the district Close with his icy fingers. Johnsy wa , touching one here and there s among his victims. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading

Home She lay, scarcely moving on her bed, looking through the scarcely: adv. not quite;small almostwindow not at the blank side of the next brick house. S She scarcely speaks a word of English. One morning the busy doctor invited Sue into the hallway S with a bushy, gray eyebrow. T Scarcely had he entered the room when the phone rang. She has one chance in ten, he said. And that chance is CF: scarcely, barely & hardly for her to want to live. Your little lady has made up her mind that shes not going to get well. Has she anything on her scarcely S There were scarcely amind? hundred people present. T She -- she wanted to paint the Bay of Naples some day, S He is so uneducated that he can scarcely write his name. said Sue. T Paint? -- bosh! Has she anything on her mind worth Close for instance? Next -- a man, thinking about twice Before Reading

Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home She lay, scarcely moving on her bed, looking through the small window at the blank side of the next brick house. One morning the busy doctor invited Sue into the hallway barely S He eats barely enough. with a bushy, gray eyebrow. T She has one chance in ten, he said. And that chance is S We barely succeeded. for her to want to live. Your little lady has made up her mind T that shes not going to get well. Has she anything on her hardly mind? S We could hardly endure the winter

here. She -- she wanted to paint the Bay of Naples some day, T said Sue. S I could hardly speak for tears. Paint? -- bosh! Has she anything on her mind worth T Close for instance? thinking about twice -- a man, CF: scarcely, barely & hardly Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home A man? said Sue. Is a man worth -- but, no, doctor; there is nothing of the kind. Well, said the doctor. I will do all that science can accomp subtract: vt. take (a number, quantity) away from a larger But whenever my patient begins to count the carriages in number orlish. quantity hera funeral procession Students were given

lot of practice in writing, I subtract 50 per cent from the curative adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing. After the doctor had gone Sue went int power of medicines. S When total taxes are o subtracted from personal the workroom andincome, cried. the Then she marched into Johnsys r remainder is called disposable income. oom with her drawing board, whistling a merry tune. Johnsy lay, scarcely making a movement under the bedclot hes, with her face towardClose the window. She was looking out an d counting -- counting backward. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home

A man? said Sue. Is a man worth -- but, no, doctor; there merry: adj. happy; cheerful; bright and is nothing of gay the kind. S Peter and Mary were strolling about among Well, said the doctor. I will do all that science can accomp the merry crowd enjoying Christmas Eve in lish. But whenever my patient begins to count the carriages in Time Square. S We had a merry time her at thefuneral party. procession I subtract 50 per cent from the curative ofthe medicines. After the doctor had gone Sue went int S The more the merrier,power the fewer better fare. o the workroom and cried. Then she marched into Johnsys r T , oom with her drawing board, whistling a merry tune. Collocation: Johnsy lay, scarcely making a movement under the bedclot as merry as a cricket/lark hes, with her face toward the window. She was looking out an make merry

d counting -- counting backward. make merry over/of/about S He is making merry over the boy who has no shoes. Before Reading Close Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home A man? said Sue. Is a man worth -- but, no, doctor; there is nothing of the kind. Well, said the doctor. I will do all that science can accomp backward: 1) adv. with the back or lish. end first But whenever my patient begins to count the carriages in S The helicopter can travel forward, backward, or sideways. her funeral procession I subtract 50 per cent from the curative

S Radar tests indicated Venus was actually power of medicines. After the doctor had gone Sue went int rotating backward, compared to our planet. o the workroom and cried. Then she marched into Johnsys r 2) adj. late in development oom with her drawing board, whistling a merry tune. S T lay, making a movement under the bedclot Some backward parts ofJohnsy the country doscarcely not have any electricity. hes, with her face toward the window. She was looking out an S Because of his long illness, Tom is backward in his d counting -- counting backward. studies. Next Before Reading Close Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading

Home S A man? said Sue. Is a man worth -- but, no, doctor; there is nothing of the kind. Well, said the doctor. I will do all that science can accomp Collocation: lish. But whenever my patient begins to count the carriages in backward and forward her funeral procession I subtract 50 per cent from the curative bend/fall/lean over backward power of medicines. After the doctor had gone Sue went int They leaned over backward to make her feel at home. o the workroom and cried. Then she marched into Johnsys r know sth. backward oom with her drawing board, whistling a merry tune. Johnsy lay, scarcely making a movement under the bedclot hes, with her face toward the window. She was looking out an d counting -- counting backward. Close Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading

After Reading Home Twelve, she said, and a little later eleven; and then ten, and nine; and then eight and seven, almost bare: adj. without covering, clothing, or decoration together. S S In giving first aid to an electric-shock victim, a caregiver must Sue looked out of the window. What not touch the victim with bare hands. count? Soil held in place bywas plant there roots isto less likely toThere blow orwas only a bare, wash away than bare soil. yard to be seen, and the blank side dreary CF: bare, naked & nude of the brick house twenty feet away. An

half way up the wall. The cold breath of autumn had Its cold outside, he brick went out with his head blown away its leaves, leaving it almost bare. bare. Six, said Johnsy, in almost a whisper. Theyre falling fast The hills were bare of vegetation. er now. Three days ago there were almost a hundred. It made my head ache to count them. But now its easy. There goes a Close Next nother one. There are only five left now. old, old ivy vine climbed bare S T S T

Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Twelve, she said, and a little later eleven; and then ten, and nine; and then eight and seven, almost CF: bare, naked & nudetogether. Sue looked naked out of the window. What was there to count? S This mad man always walked around naked. There was only a bare, T dreary yard to be seen, and the blank side S The fallacy has been in its naked absurdity.

ofexposed the brick house twenty feet away. An T old, old ivy vine climbed half way up the brick wall. The cold breath of autumn had nude away itsartist. leaves, leaving it almost S This model is posingblown in the nude for an T bare. Six, said Johnsy, in almost a whisper. Theyre falling fast S He is living in a single ernude now.room. Three days ago there were almost a hundred. It made T my head ache to count them. But now its easy. There goes a Close nother one. There are only five left now. Before Reading Global Reading

Detailed Reading After Reading Home Twelve, she said, and a little later eleven; and then ten, and nine; and then eight and seven, almost dreary: adj. dull; gloomy; causing low spirits together. Addressing envelopes all the time is dreary work. S T Sue looked out of the window. What was there to count? There was only a bare, dreary yard to be seen, and the blank side Foreign trade prospects are dreary. of the brick house twenty feet away. An Close old, old ivy vine climbed half way up the brick wall. The cold breath of autumn had blown away its leaves, leaving it almost bare. Six, said Johnsy, in almost a whisper. Theyre falling fast er now. Three days ago there were almost a hundred. It made my head ache to count them. But now its easy. There goes a

nother one. There are only five left now. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Twelve, she said, and a little later eleven; and then ten, and nine; and then eight and seven, almost in a whisper: in a low voice together. S S He bent down and addressed Sueherlooked in a whisper. out of the window. What was there to count? There was only a bare, She said it in a whisper, so I yard to be seen, and the blank side dreary couldnt hear. of the brick house twenty feet away. An

old, old ivy vine climbed Close half way up the brick wall. The cold breath of autumn had blown away its leaves, leaving it almost bare. Six, said Johnsy, in almost a whisper. Theyre falling fast er now. Three days ago there were almost a hundred. It made my head ache to count them. But now its easy. There goes a nother one. There are only five left now. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Five what, dear? Leaves. On the ivy vine. When the last one falls I must nonsense: n. foolish talk, go,ideas, too.behavior Ive known that for three days. Didnt the doctor tell you? everything from nonsense to S Currently, the Web contains Oh,theI US never heardorofUSsuch nonsense.

up-to-the-minute news about presidency What have old ivy leaves to do with your stock quotes from Wall Street. getting well? Dont be so silly. Why, the S doctor told me this morning that your ch T I have never heard such nonsense! ances for getting well realClose soon were ten to one! Try to take some soup now, and l et Sudie go and buy port wine for her sic k child. You neednt get any more wine, said Johnsy, keeping h er eyes fixed out the window. There goes another. No, I do nt want any soup. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home

That leaves just four. I want to see the last one fall before it turn loose: allow (sth.) gets to be free of control dark. Then Ill go, too. Im tired of waiting. Im tired of thin king.inI the want S He turned the horse loose field.to turn loose my hold on everything, and go sailin g down, down, just like one of those poor, tired leaves. S The World Bank makes grants to developing countries toloose. sleep, said Sue. I must call Behrman up to be my but it doesnt just turn theTry money model for the old miner. Ill not be gone a minute. T Old Behrman was a painter who lived on the ground floor b Close eneath them. He was past sixty and had a long white beard c urling down over his chest. Despite looking the part, Behrman was a failure in art. For forty years he had been always about to paint a masterpiece, but had never yet begun it. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading

After Reading Home That leaves just four. I want to see the last one fall before it look the part: have an appearance a particular role,Im tired of waiting. Im tired of thin gets dark.forThen Ill go,job, too. or position I want to looked turn loose my hold on everything, and go sailin S If he wasnt actually aking. thief he certainly the part. g down, down, just like one of those poor, tired leaves. Despite looking the part, Michael was Try to sleep, said Sue. I must call Behrman up to be my not an artist at all. model for the old miner. Ill not be gone a minute. Old Behrman was a painter who lived on the ground floor b eneath them. He was past sixty and had a long white beard c urling down over his chest. Despite looking the part, Behrman Close was a failure in art. For forty years he had been always about

to paint a masterpiece, but had never yet begun it. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home That leaves just four. I want to see the last one fall before it masterpiece: n. a piecegets of work, esp.Then art, which is the bestIm o tired of waiting. Im tired of thin dark. Ill go, too. f want to turnhasloose its typeking. or theI best a person done my hold on everything, and go sailin S The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is

g down, down, just like one of those poor, tired leaves. considered Mark Twains masterpiece. Try to sleep, said Sue. I must call Behrman up to be my S model for the old miner. Ill not be gone a minute. T The Ninth Symphony was Old Beethovens Behrman was a painter who lived on the ground floor b masterpiece. eneath them. He was past sixty and had a long white beard c urling down over his chest. Despite looking the part, Behrman Close was a failure in art. For forty years he had been always about to paint a masterpiece, but had never yet begun it. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home He earned a little by serving as a model to those young arti to excess: to an extreme stsdegree who could

not pay the price of a professional. He drank gi S His father never smoked drank to excess. n toorexcess, and still S Dont carry your griefetorest excess. he talked of his coming masterpiece. For th was a fierce little old man, who mocked terribly at so Patten: in excess of S ftness in any one, and who regarded himself as guard dog to t Never spend in excess of your he two young income. artists in theClose studio above.

Sue found Behrman smelling strongly of gin in his dimly ligh ted studio below. In one corner was a blank canvas on an eas el that had been waiting there for twenty-five years to receive t he first line of the masterpiece. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home He earned a little by serving as a model to those young arti for the rest: as regardssts other matters who could not pay the price of a professional. He drank gi S The working conditions in my new joband are excellent, but

n to excess, still talked for the rest, I am not impressed. S T ftness any one, For the rest, I could not noticeinanything more.and e rest he was a fierce little old man, who mocked terribly at so Collocation: as to the rest and all the rest of it S of his coming masterpiece. For th who regarded himself as guard dog to t he two young artists in the studio above. Sue found

Behrman smelling strongly of gin in his dimly ligh ted studio below. In one corner was a blank canvas on an eas He is young and handsome and well-educated and all el that had been waiting there the rest of it. for twenty-five years to receive t he first line of the masterpiece. Close Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home He earned a little by serving as a model to those young arti fierce: adj. 1) violent and angry sts who could not pay the price of a professional. He drank gi n to excess, and still talked of his coming masterpiece. For th

a fierce looking man rest hestorm waskilled a fierce little old man, who mocked terribly at so S It was estimated that e the fierce at least several thousand people andftness left moreinthan million without anyone one, and who regarded himself as guard dog to t homes. 2) intense; strong S S S T he two young artists in the studio above.

While Apple enjoyed brighter sales, competitors in the IBM PC world Sue found Behrman smelling strongly of gin in his dimly ligh fought a fierce battle for market ted studio below. In one corner was a blank canvas on an eas share. el that had been waiting there for twenty-five years to receive t Because there is so much unemployment, he first line of the the masterpiece. competition for jobs is very fierce. Close Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home

He earned a little by serving as a model to those young arti mock: sts who could not pay the price of a professional. He drank gi 1) v. ridicule; make fun of n to excess, and still talked of his coming masterpiece. For th Pattern: mock (at) sb./sth restlaugh he was S He made .all the othereboys by a fierce little old man, who mocked terribly at so mocking the way the ftness teacher spoke in any one, and who regarded himself as guard dog to t and walked. he two young artists in the studio above. The student did his best, and the teacher was wrong to mock at found his effort. Sue Behrman smelling strongly of gin in his dimly ligh 2) adj. not real or true; like (in appearance, taste, etc.) something ted studio below. In one corner was a blank canvas on an eas real

S The army training exercises ended with a mock battle. el that had been waiting there for twenty-five years to receive t S Before each debate, is expected engage in mock hehefirst line oftothe masterpiece. debate. Close Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home She told him of Johnsys fancy, and how she feared she would, indeed, ligh fancy: t and fragile as a leaf herself, float awa 1. n. y, when her slight hold upon the world 1) sth. imagined; unfounded opinion or belief

Old Behrman, with his re S Children usually havegrew a livelyweaker. fancy. d eyes shouted his c S I think he will come, but its onlyplainly a fancystreaming, of mine. such foolish imaginings. 2) liking formed withoutontempt the help offor reason S I have taken a fancy to that silly hat. What! he cried. Are there people in the world foolish enou She stopped to examine thedie exhibit that struck her fancy. gh to because leafs drop off from a vine? I have never hea 2. vt.

rd of such a thing. Why do you allow such silly ideas to come i 1) form a picture of; imagine nto that head of hers? God! This is not a place in which one so S Fancy her having a fool like that for a husband! good as Miss Johnsy should lie sick. Some day I will paint a m Can you fancy yourself on the moon? asterpiece, and we shall all go away. Yes. S T Next Before Reading Close Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home She told him of Johnsys fancy, and how she feared she would, indeed, ligh fancy: t and fragile as a leaf herself, float awa 2) have a liking for; wish y,forwhen her slight hold upon the world

S I fancy something sweet to eat. grew weaker. Old Behrman, with his re S I had a suspicion that they fancied each other. d eyes plainly streaming, shouted his c 3. vi. form a picture of sth.; imagin for such foolish imaginings. ontempt S e What! he cried. Are there people in the world foolish enou gh to colored; die because leafs drop off from a vine? I have never hea 4. adj. ornamental or brightly not ordinary rd of such a thing. Why do you allow such silly ideas to come i S fancy cakes nto for that S That pattern is too fancy me.head of hers? God! This is not a place in which one so good as Miss Johnsy should lie sick. Some day I will paint a m asterpiece, and we shall all go away. Yes. T Just fancy!

Close Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home She told him of Johnsys fancy, and how she feared she would, indeed, ligh stream: t and fragile as a leaf herself, float awa 1. v. 1) produce a continuousy,flow of liquid when her slight hold upon the world S His eyes were streaming with tears from the grew weaker. Old Behrman, with his re coughing. S The little childs nose is streaming because of the d eyes plainly streaming, shouted his c cold. 2) move in a continuous flow; pour out ontempt for such foolish imaginings. S Blood streamed down his nose. S

They streamed out of the movie theater. What! he cried. Areathere 2. n. a natural flow of water, usu. smaller than a river; long people in the world foolish enou and gh to die because leafs drop off from a vine? I have never hea S cross a stream almost continuousrd series of events, people, objects, of such a thing. Why do etc. you allow such silly ideas to come i S S T a stream of people going into the

house nto that head of hers? God! This is not a place in which one so good as Miss Johnsy should lie sick. Some day I will paint a m He doesnt have the asterpiece, courage to go and we shall all go away. Yes. against the stream of public opinion. Before Reading Close Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home S Johnsy was sleeping when they went upstairs. Sue pulled t he shade down, andagain motioned Behrman into the other room. I

persistent: adj. continuing; occurring again and n there they peered out the window fearfully at the ivy vine. T The persistent growth of the EU countries has been hen they looked at each other for a moment without speaking. remarkable. A persistent, cold rain was falling, mingled with snow. Behrma Neither high prices nor high wages could explain n, in his old blue shirt, took his seat as the miner on an upturn persistent depression and massed unemployment. kettle for a rock. Close When Sue awoke from an hours sleep the next morning sh e found Johnsy with dull, wide-open eyes staring at the drawn green shade. Pull it up; I want to see, she ordered, in a whisper. Wearily Sue obeyed. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home

Johnsy was sleeping when they went upstairs. Sue pulled t down, and motioned Behrman into the other room. I mingle: v. mix (followedhe by shade with) Pattern: mingle with n there they peered out the window fearfully at the ivy vine. T be mingled with hen they looked at each other for a moment without speaking. S Laughter mingled with the music, and appreciative A persistent, cold rain was falling, mingled with snow. Behrma comments. S Her excitement was mingled n, in his bluefeeling shirt,oftook withold a slight fear. his seat as the miner on an upturn ed kettle for a rock. S When Sue awoke from an hours sleep the next morning sh T The smell of perfume and perspiration mingled in air. Johnsy with dull, wide-open eyes staring at the drawn e the found green shade. Pull it up; I want to see, she ordered, in a whisper. Close Wearily Sue obeyed.

Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home But, Lo! after the beating rain stand out: be easily seen or among andabove fierce windothers that had endured S The trip to Africa stood out in my memory. through the night, there yet stood These writers stood out against above the the rest. brick wall one ivy out Collocation: leaf. It was the last on the vine. Still stand by dark green near its stem, but with

stand for itsedges colored yellow, it hung stand on bravely from a branch some twenty stand well with Close feet above the ground. It is the last one, said Johnsy. I thought it would surely fal l during the night. I heard the wind. It will fall today, and I shall die at the same time. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home The day wore away, and even through the twilight they c ould see the lone ivy leaf clinging to its stem against the wal l. And then, with the coming of the night the north wind was wear away: 1) (of time) pass gradually again loosed. it was light enough Johnsy, the merciless, comman

S The day wore away, and When we still couldnt find a solution to the problem. ded that the shade be raised. S The fullness of spring has not yet The ivyworn leaf was still there. quite away. Johnsy lay for a long time looking at it. And then she calle 2) (cause to) become thin by constant use d or todamaged Sue, who was stirring her chicken soup over the gas st S The pattern on the handle had completely worn ove. away. S Ive been a bad girl, Sudie, said Johnsy. Something ha T The dripping of the water is wearing s made thataway last the leafstone. stay there to show me how wicked I wa Collocation:

s. It is a sin to want to die. You may bring me a little soup n wear down ow, and some milk with a little port in it and -- no; bring me wear off a hand-mirror first, and then pack some pillows about me, a wear out nd I will sit up and watch Close you cook. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home S S The day wore away, and even through the twilight they c ould see the lone ivy leaf clinging to its stem against the wal cling to: hold tight to l. And then, with the coming of the night the north wind was again loosed. The frightened child clung to her mother. When it was light enough Johnsy, the merciless, comman

that to the She wore a silk dress ded that clung hershade figure. be raised. The ivy leaf was still there. Johnsy lay for a long time looking at it. And then she calle d to Sue, who was stirring her chicken soup over the gas st Close ove. Ive been a bad girl, Sudie, said Johnsy. Something ha s made that last leaf stay there to show me how wicked I wa s. It is a sin to want to die. You may bring me a little soup n ow, and some milk with a little port in it and -- no; bring me a hand-mirror first, and then pack some pillows about me, a nd I will sit up and watch you cook. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home The day wore away, and even through the twilight they c ould see the lone ivy leaf clinging to its stem against the wal

l. And then, withmorals the coming of the night the north wind was sin: n. offence against God, religion or good again loosed. S In Christian theology, the first sin was committed by Adam. When it was light enough Johnsy, the merciless, comman S The man confessed his sin to the priest. ded that the shade be raised. CF: sin, crime & evil The ivy leaf was still there. Johnsy lay for a long time looking at it. And then she calle sin d to Sue, who was stirring her chicken soup over the gas st S Hester did not confess her sins to the priest. ove. T Ive been a bad girl, Sudie, said Johnsy. Something ha S Lying, stealing, dishonesty, and cruelty are sins. s made that last leaf stay there to show me how wicked I wa T s. It is a sin to want to die. You may bring me a little soup n crime ow, and some milk with a little port in it and -- no; bring me S The police prevent and detect

a hand-mirror first, and then pack some pillows about me, a crime. T nd I will sit up andNext watch Close you cook. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home The day wore away, and even through the twilight they c ould see the lone ivy leaf clinging to its stem against the wal l. And then, with the coming of the night the north wind was CF: sin, crime & evil again loosed. When it was light enough Johnsy, the merciless, comman S Its a crime that he bullies his children that way. ded that the shade be raised. T The ivy leaf was still there. evil Johnsy lay for a long time looking at it. And then she calle d to Sue, who was stirring her chicken soup over the gas st

S to do evil ove. T Ive been a bad girl, Sudie, said Johnsy. Something ha S to return good for evil s made that last leaf stay there to show me how wicked I wa T s. It is a sin to want to die. You may bring me a little soup n ow, and some milk with a little port in it and -- no; bring me a hand-mirror first, and then pack some pillows about me, a nd I will sit up and watch Close you cook. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home An hour later she said: Sudie, some day I hope to paint the Bay of Naples. acute: adj. 1) (of diseases) coming quickly to the criticalcame stage in the afternoon, and Sue had an excu The

doctor S She was taken to the hospital suffering from acute se to go into the hallway as he left. appendicitis ( ). Even chances, said the doctor, taking Sues thin, shakin His disease is not acute but chronic. g hand in his. 2) severe S Food shortages in someWith nursing youll win. And now I must see another Africangood countries are becoming acute. S case I have downstairs. Behrman, his name is --some kind T His distrust of reporters was particularly acute on this of an artist, I believe. Pneumonia, too. He is an old, weak m story. 3) (of the mind or the senses) able the to notice small an, and attack is differences, acute. There is no hope for him; but he esp. of meaning or sound; working very well; sharp S an acute thinker goes to the hospital today to be made more comfortable.

S Dogs have an acute sense of smell. Before Reading Next Close Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home An hour later she said: Sudie, some day I hope to paint the Bay of Naples. CF: acute, critical & crucial The in the afternoon, and Sue had an excu doctor came acute se to go into the hallway as he left. S There was an acute lack of food. Even chances, said the doctor, taking Sues thin, shakin T

S hand in his. The problem is at itsgmost acute in major cities. T With good nursing youll win. And now I must see another critical crucial case I have downstairs. Behrman, his name is --some kind crucial of an artist, I believe. Pneumonia, too. He is an old, weak m S I didnt realize the unemployment problem was all that critical. an, and the attack is acute. There is no hope for him; but he T S Another minutes lack of oxygen could be critical. goes to the hospital today to be made more comfortable. T

Before Reading Next Close Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home An hour later she said: Sudie, some day I hope to paint the Bay of Naples. CF: acute, critical & crucial The in the afternoon, and Sue had an excu doctor came crucial se to go into the hallway as he left. Even chances, said the doctor, taking Sues thin, shakin S Speed is crucial to our success. g hand in his.

T With good nursing youll win. And now I must see another S They are carrying out the crucial part of the experiment. case I have downstairs. Behrman, his name is --some kind T Close of an artist, I believe. Pneumonia, too. He is an old, weak m an, and the attack is acute. There is no hope for him; but he goes to the hospital today to be made more comfortable. Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Home Didnt you wonder why it never fluttered or moved when t flutter: he wind blew? Ah, darling, its Behrmans masterpiece -- he 1. v. (cause to) move about in a quick, irregular painted it there theway

night that the last leaf fell. S S The bird fluttered its wings wildly but it could not get off the ground. The butterfly fluttered into the room. S T His heart fluttered with excitement. 2. n. fluttering movement S S There was a flutter of wings among the trees. Her new book on violence caused a flutter. Close Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading

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